Saturday, December 17, 2005

Paris cobblestones


One thing very typical of Paris is our cobblestone streets. They are very slippery when it rains (I mean very!), but of course, it is far better to have them than mud. It is King Philippe Auguste, around 1185, who decided that owners of houses and/or streets would have to pay themselves for the paving. Needless to say, this measure was not very popular. As a result, only some streets (mainly St Jacques, St Martin, St Antoine and St-Honoré) ended up getting paved. After his reign, the "government" - well the kings (see here, for a complete listing) took the street paving in charge.

18 comments:

  1. I love the cobblestones here. They not only make Paris still look like a village, but the sound of cars going over them is unique. Wasn't it written that after the revolution and the destruction of the Bastille, that they paved the streets of Paris with the stones left over so that the French wouldn't foget? Or is that a myth?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree with Michael. I absolutely love the cobblestone streets here!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. The crosswalks used to be marked with big nails which were at the origin of the expression "traverser dans les clous" (litteraly: cross between nails). Needless to say that bikers love the combinaison cobblestones + nails + rain.

    I think the first paving in Paris were made of wood (?)

    JM-

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for visiting my blog. I have been enjoying yours immensely. I visited Paris over a year ago and fell in love with it, so many shoes! And beautiful architecture and amazing history, too. I love your photos and the information you give.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Michael, I forget, but what you just wrote seems kind of familiar.

    And about the picture: I LOVE IT!!! That is, indeed, quintessential Paris!!!

    Also made me think about May 68 a little ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  6. ...after the ... destruction of the Bastille, that they paved the streets of Paris with the stones...

    No, the stones of the old Bastille are the foundation of the Pont de Concorde.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The cobblestone is so pretty, it looks so smooth. I love this photo.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What they said about the cobblestones, after the revolution, is that they would start to take them away, because people were taking them off, using them as stones or projectiles against the police. so that's why they stopped using them/ replaced them with normal ways.
    very nice indeed, although it's true that it's a rollerblader's nightmare...

    ReplyDelete
  9. This is a great shot. The lighting is perfect. I always think of light when I think of my time in Paris.

    ReplyDelete
  10. At least they slow traffic down - where cobbles still exist on the roads. Something that is needed in Paris!

    John,
    91540 Fontenay-le-Vicomte

    ReplyDelete
  11. You have an outstanding good and well structured site. I enjoyed browsing through it » » »

    ReplyDelete
  12. Cool blog, interesting information... Keep it UP »

    ReplyDelete
  13. Contemporary rock art Paris cobblestone painting
    See the show

    ReplyDelete
  14. NEVERTHELESS, THE CIVIL LAW is and must be neutral about who has a more noble or rewarding faith. The breakaway parishes ought to win every Office 2010facet of the lawsuit not becauseMicrosoft Office 2010 their beliefs or their politics are better, Microsoft wordbut because both lawOffice 2007and equity, along with common sense, are on Microsoft Officetheir side.Microsoft Office 2007 Not only does Virginia state law (the Division Statute)Office 2007 keyexplicitly apply to just such a Office 2007 downloadsituation as now exists, but the history Office 2007 Professionalespecially of The Falls Church argues against the claims of Outlook 2010the Virginia Diocese with which theyMicrosoft outlookhave disassociated.Microsoft outlook 2010First, The Falls Church wasWindows 7 founded, formed, and developed long before the diocese, or the national Episcopal Church, even existed.

    ReplyDelete