Monday, July 07, 2008

Return to the Cité du Patrimoine


About 2 weeks ago, I took this photo and said I would tell you all about the wonderful museum outside of which I took it. Now is the time... It's called "La cité de l'architecture et du patrimoine" and it allows you to see the most beautiful sculptures/doors/gargoyles... of the main French religious buildings since the very first ages in one single place. And it's not just paintings of photos but actual casts of originals. It's very impressive (have a look at this or this or this to have a global view), moving and beautiful. I chose to show you one of the many "Pleurant" (Mourners?) that are part of Jean sans Peur's tomb.

37 comments:

  1. I love how reverent he looks. I wish I could have that kind of peace in my life...

    ReplyDelete
  2. I hit "enter" before I finished... I meant to say that in his mourning, he seems to have achieved some kind of peace. It's interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  3. A true treasure of our inheritance... This 'pleurant' is so deeply meditated... A beautiful piece of work and nice shots well-served by the red background.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Eric, thanks for the mini tour. What a beautiful museum. I can't wait to visit it the next time I'm in Paris. I really like the skeleton sculpture - very eerie. The virtual tour is a work of magic, what a treat.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice angle, I like how all the other monks are turning away in the background.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Beautiful! What amazing pieces of art these are. I love 360° virtual tours of such wonderful places! Thanks Eric! (I think, perhaps, a few more exclamation marks are in oder?!!!!!)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey Eric (or anyone who knows), do you have any information on the skeleton rotting looking guy in the 2nd virtual tour? Something in my brain is trying to make a connection but it's just not happening!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow, beautiful is the right word for it!

    ReplyDelete
  9. A definite must stop the next time I'm in Paree! The virtual tour is spiking the needle on my WOW METER! Too cool, Eric.

    I don't mean to be grave, but I especially dig the skeleton in the second virtual stop. I do think he's looking for a "body shop" (erph!)likely in the land of Dante's Inferno! What's he holding anyway? a rock, a potato, Eric's camera? [Okay, cadaver my mouth in duct tape! I'll stop!]

    Soosha...the name of Seemore Bones is actually Keith Richards. Hope this helps. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. What's that egg the rotting skeleton is holding?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Such exquisite craftsmanship! And the panels were designed to tell stories to the illiterate masses, but now we can not "read" them. So who is illiterate anyway?

    ReplyDelete
  12. How wonderful this place is! Thank you Eric. What I love is that one can see these casts closely, which is not possible to do at many of the original sights as they are often high up on walls or above doorways. This brings everything into view where the enchanting details can be observed and elicit thoughtful comments like Buzzgirl's. Your photo is very lovely and captures the magic of this museum perfectly. I love the red color they chose for the interior, and what looks like broken marble pieces for the floor. Re. the gazing skeletal figure, could it be a heart he holds?
    -Kim
    Seattle Daily Photo

    ReplyDelete
  13. I am glad you shared this with us because it is a must-see!

    I don't think the skeleton is Keith, Coltrane, it's looks much too healthy.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Once again Eric, I am floored, that was a wild tour! I love statuary in general and now I feel as if I were there-merci bien!
    Arnold, I don't mean to sound morbid, but I was thinking that egg may be the skeleton's heart. Any other ideas anyone?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Kim, Sorry, I missed your comment the first go round, I am glad someone else thought the same!
    & very funny Coltrane!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Kim and Lily...I think you may be onto something with the "heart" notion...it certainly sounds plausible to me.

    Cali...nice one!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Learning from the master, Coltrane ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Jean without fright? Hmm. How so? Great colours in this photo Eric.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Coltrane et al; i've answered re the Wimbledon final yesterday on yesterday's comments. Rained off twice but completed at length! Wonderful tennis.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I don't know if you've already been to the Victoria & Albert Museum of London (a must-see) but there is a whole room dedicated to the casts that is just blow-minding.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Cali...I bow to your kind words!
    Lynn...I replied in yesterday's postings. Ciao!

    ReplyDelete
  22. rofl! I'm inclined to agree with cali, looks much too healthy for Keith! I would also agree that you're the master, coltrane, but Michael has held the title for a very long time so you have a lot to live up to before you can inherit it! ;p

    ReplyDelete
  23. And after another look I'm also incline to agree that Bones McCoy there is holding a heart. Although it could be a kidney. Perhaps he died of kidney failure?

    ReplyDelete
  24. A clever photo, Eric, with the three other statue's backs turned to the camera. Your subject has a very strong personality. The folds of his garment, his hands, his mouth and fingers ... all just so something, and I am not sure what. Is it peace?

    ReplyDelete
  25. Soosha...I agree, Michael is indeed a master "punster." "Perhaps he died of kidney failure." -- Too funny!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Speaking of masters, where are Jeff, Lucio, and the "G-Man"-- Tall Gary?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Are you kidney me? Opun for business.

    This museum is at the Trocadero, n'est-ce pas? I've not visited there, but knowing of this museum is a good reason to get my derriere over there next time.

    ReplyDelete
  28. It is sculpted with such emotion, it reminds me a tiny bit of Bernini's Sta. Maria in Ecstasy.

    Carrie:When you pack, less is more!Thin clothes for heat and for layering if you need to warm up.
    Do not fold clothes to put in your luggage. Put pants in and leave the legs draped outside the luggage. Leave the arms of your shirts outside your luggage. After you have layered everything in, then fold all the hanging clothes over and into the luggage. You won't believe how much room it saves, and the bonus is, your clothes don't wrinkle.
    Rose(I can't wait to see her again) and I will miss UKLynn as she won't be able to join us on Friday. She promises to meet us another time.
    You really have created more than just pictures,Eric.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm glad of that PHX ;)

    And I'm glad you liked this museum, because I can tell you that no photo will ever make you feel what you experience in this place.

    Like Kim said, the most amazing part is that you can really see the finest little details of each statue even the smallest one. You could have thought that since some of these statues are sometime up high on facades they would not have bothered too much we the details and in fact they did!

    And Buzzgirl, "I wish I could have that kind of peace in my life..." they are statues, they are not real ;) It's easier for them than for us humans...

    ReplyDelete
  30. Nice to read you Eric, as always.

    ReplyDelete
  31. PHX_CDG - Wow -- thanks so much! :)

    When I started to read about the arms and legs hanging out I was cracking up picturing myself carrying my luggage thru the airport like that and I thought, "well, she's been asked one too many times how to save space and this is a pretty good wiseacre answer"! But then it turned out you weren't kidding and I can hardly wait to try it! Merci, merci!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Thanks so much, Eric! This looks a bit like the Musee Carnavelet, in terms of its focus on the history, traditions and architecture of France. It's on my list of must-see's for the next trip to Paris.

    Marilyn

    ReplyDelete