Thursday, September 21, 2006

Foie gras on a stick anyone?


Last night, I went to a cocktail party at the Palais de Tokyo for the launch of a new magazine (Courrier Cadres). After the necessary small-talk, I went to the buffet, and there I found a waiter in front of a bowl of liquid nitrogen in which he kept dipping little brochettes of salmon and foie gras! A-ma-zing. I ended up with a sort of foie gras ice cream (can you imagine?!) very cold (you have to wait a little bit before eating it). If you want to know more, the caterer's name is Nomad, and he is based in Paris and London.

46 comments:

  1. how do you manage to get invited to all these events??

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  2. He he... Highly classified anonymous, highly classified!

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  3. Is this the French version of fast-food? ;)
    Anyway, "Courrier Cadres" is the title of an ANPE magazine that's been on for years, so what's the beans about his one?

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  4. Oops, sorry, it was APEC [been in the U.S. for too long]. So, what's the news about it?

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  5. I've never seen Foie gras before. I have to say....it doesn't look very appetizing....green???

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  6. The green is actually a sauce they added during the process of trying to be extra chic...

    LA Frog. They made a new format for Courrier Cadres splitting the job ads and the editorial part. The cocktail party was the occasion to announce this split.

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  7. Liquid Nitrogen? My dermetologist used to keep some in a thermos and dipped cotton swabs in for use in freezing off warts. Never in a million years would it occur to me to use it in food preparation. How did the chef keep his fingers from becoming frozen? A-ma-zing indeed! (and nice photo, BTW!)
    -Kim

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  8. Liquid nitrogen ?
    marrant. c'est ce qu'ils utilisent pour bruler les verrues...

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  9. Um...doesn't look very appetizing. And since I have no idea what foie gras is and my browser keeps freezing every time I try to open a new window I'm just gonna stick with a general EW. And since a foods appearance is very connected to it's success I'm gonna sayt hat the chef wasn't too successful in being extra chic.

    Eric, are you a photographer for a living as well? Maybe for some swanky magazine or something and that's how you get invited to all these awesome events?

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  10. Okay Eric, I give up.
    I guess now I have to live in hope that someday in the future you'll show us again some hot parisian gendarme on your great blog...

    Without adding fuel to yesterday's fat woman forum's fire, here is an interesting "gendarme" which will fit with absolutly any body shape...
    Weird isn't it?

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  11. Hmmm...wonder if it's fattening...or if the liquid nitrogen burns it off before it hits your system...now that would be cool!

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  12. Do you think I could get him to come out to Salt Lake City, Utah to cater a wedding? Maybe if I paid him enough?

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  13. I wonder if this liquid nitrogen will take off as a new foody must do????

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  14. Blondtown - you crack me up!

    Yes, the liquid nitrogen experience as a kid to burn off warts makes it strange to think of it as a "chic" accessory, but how come nobody has raised the same level of debate about the treatment of animals for the making of foie gras as yesterday's "obese" post? Is there some duck discrimination going on here? Don't you care? (said tongue in cheek)

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  15. hmm....the idea of foie gras is not appealing to me....but since i'm going to france in the spring i guess i should try it to be officially parisienne.....

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  16. I hope this tasted good, because it is about the most unappetizing looking thing I have ever seen!

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  17. J'ai récemment mangé de la crème brûlée au foie gras, mais je n'ai pas imaginé une glace fois gras !

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  18. here is something to consider = http://www.GourmetCruelty.com/

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  19. Despite the comments, I think I'd give it a try.
    I checked the caterer's site and I have to admit that any of the coktails they show there have a better look than this foie gras ice cream...

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  20. Just a question Eric, are you sure it wasn't dry ice he was doing this in and not liquid nitrogen? I wonder if that's safe to eat.

    Lucy in L.A... Interesting link, but I still love the stuff.

    ::nahal::...you'll definitely have to try it when you're here. A good one has lots of flavour and with toast and perhaps a little bit of prunes....yumm!!!

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  21. Eric - that sounds amazing! Looks a bit weird, but then so do snails and frogs legs (!). Fois Gras is amazing...

    Michael - it will be liquid nitrogen. It is a neutral gas and quite safe - why should it be a problem? It boils off at -200 C or something so there is nothing left in the food, just very cold!

    It is a process I believe originated in the UK (good food from the UK! yes it does exist... in fact better than France...?!) by a chef called Heston Blumethal and his infamous restaurant called The Fat Duck.

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  22. Think I'll keep to the cucumber sandwiches.

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  23. > Michael : about the other subject… oh please no ! I like Eric's pictures and their diversity but find the controversial comments sometime not so COOL and even quite depressing !…
    ;o)

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  24. Yes please, I'd love some ;o)))

    Caters work hard make something new out of antique food, so they can keep their customers (foie gras was invented by the Romans, I think)

    Instant freeze by dipping in a liquid gaz is a recently promoted process. This comes from Hervé This, who is a professeur au College de France, by the way. (We French people take food soooo seriously we teach it in Sorbonne University)
    http://www.college-de-france.fr/chaires/chaire10/page_herve/recherche_herve.htm

    This has inspired a some chefs around the world, the most famous one being Ferran Adria of ElBulli's

    http://www.elbulli.com/

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  25. oops, sorry, my link to ElBulli's restaurant is not what I expected, I'm afraid

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  26. The "mystaire"...perfect for the upcoming Halloween. At first glance I thought the lumps on the sticks were green skulls. Love the photo but I started avoiding foie gras when I was 4years old. Here in the U.S. hotdogs made of salmon served with wasabi sauce will be featured at a new chain restaurant called "Frankatude". The target market is Yuppie folks.

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  27. I just checked the website of Nomad... and guess what ????? Now I'm hungry !!!! Forunately, it's lunch time in Paris ;-))))

    Bon Appétit !!!!

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  28. Eric - What fascinates me is that you go everywhere with your camera! That stuff looks fairly gross, by the way.

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  29. “Avant garde” Catalan chef Ferran Adria is considered by Gourmet magazine as “the Salvador Dali of the kitchen". He launched this innovative (and controversial) method of cooking in the 80’s using nitrogen also called “molecular gastronomy” . His restaurant “Ell Bulli” (a trendy place with long queues as you can imagine) is closed for 6 months every year and turns into an a ultra-modern laboratory where he experiments and creates new flavors combinations using “foam” techniques… We saw a very interesting documentary about him on French TV5 “Envoyé Spécial”about 2 years ago. It was amazing and fascinating. Many of have tried said that you get a real sense of taste like an “explosion” of flavors in your mouth… I think I'd like to try it! Did you get this feeling of explosition Eric? :-)

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  30. Interesting shot Eric! Looks like green tea ice cream, in the shape of mutant heads, atop a pair of chopsticks! LOL! Looooooooooove GTI by the way--have it at my fave Japanese restaurant (Yukisushi) everytime I eat there! ;-)

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  31. A recent Wine Spectator called fois gras one of the pillars of French cuisine. It's amazing stuff...ice cream, though...

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  32. Pas surprenant que les fliquettes soient bien grasses si elles se gavent de foie gras au Palais e Tokyo!!

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  33. The green coloring does not make it look appetizing. Reminds me of green eggs and ham.

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  34. Soosha: FOIE GRAS: "the liver of specially fattened geese or ducks, used as a table delicacy, esp. in the form of a paste (pâté de foie gras). " Trader's Joe carries some, in the US, although it's usually a cheaper version, made with chicken.

    (PS. Try cleaning your cache, it might help your browser problems)

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  35. To dxbluey from a Yank: "Spam spam spam spam,..." In fact that crap comes from the state where I live. Not something this boy's proud of, but there you go.

    Food experimentation is cool. (Just paid a royalty to Michael.) Good to hear from Arnaud: bon jour. It's lunchtime here, time for, um, chicken sandwich. And apple! Oh, I'm healthy.

    Just bought tickets for the first round of baseball. Allez Twins!!

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  36. Here in the States, the city of Chicago enacted a ban on the serving of foie gras at any restaurant located within city limits. The point of the resolution was to "eliminate cruelty to animals." Perhaps they should visit one of the slaughterhouses that the city made famous - but I can't see them banning filet mignon at Morton's (the nation's top steak house chain that got its start in Chicago).

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  37. Hé hé, bonne idée. But what about the taste ? Whas is good ?

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  38. Le foie gras, j'ais ete eleve dedans etant originaire du perigord noir, avec un petit cahors 'haut de serre'...Hummmmmmmmmmm
    La photo est bien prise et originale. Bravo

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  39. Paul, are you serious? Chicago banned foie gras? That can't be true...do the government officials not have enough to do?

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  40. tomate, nope, not my browser. It just randomly started happening when we got our last software update for our internet no matter how many times we refresh or clean or restart or whatever. I'm guessing there was a bug, but our anti-virus and anti-spyware can't find it. Thanks, though. So COOL of you. (sorry, Michael. You know I luff ya! But not in that way!!!)

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  41. I knew foie gras was forbiden in an American city: must be Chicago then, according to what Paul wrote.

    I also know that some propaganda tell Swiss they shouldn't eat foie gras.

    French eat about 85% of the world foie gras production, and i belong to them (on the french side, not on the duck side...lol)

    But i also know a very good vegetarian restaurant in a peaceful street not far from Notre Dame.

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  42. Wahoo lots of comments tonight (not as much as yesterday of course, but foie gras is less controversial - well, maybe not in the States actually LOL)

    So the taste first: it was in fact more surprising than good. The cold tend to kinda soften the taste. The one on the photo is not foie gras but Salmon with a gree sauce.

    Alex, you're right, the idea, apparently, originated from this spannish guy who, seems to be very famous.

    Soosha, I am not a professionnal photographer but still get invited to a few parties (I said a few, not a lot!)

    Ama, I am sorry, I cannot put hot gendarmes everyday! LOL.

    Thanks everyone for all your comments, I love it when my photos start conversations.

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  43. You're just friends with someone semi-important to important, aren't you?!?

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