Monday, April 07, 2008

Meat Chateaubriand... (again!)


You probably know "Filet mignon", the thick cut from the tenderloin which is also often referred to as Chateaubriand. Well Chateaubriand (François René, was his first name) was not a famous chef but... a writer and a politician who lived a fascinating, adventurous life, between 1768 and 1848. The kind of guys that make your life look totally dull (check all what he's done here)! His most famous book is probably Mémoire d'Outre-tombe, but I never read it. I found his bust in the heart of the 7th arrondissement, but he has several others including one in Saint Malo, his hometown. PS: sorry for this "reprint", as you may have noticed the first time I posted this photo, it did not show...

57 comments:

  1. Here he is!! Okay, I wanted to say the same thing than the other day, but I don't remember so...nice picture and I didn't know that it was the name of a meat piece. (really?!)

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  2. GF!!
    Je pète la forme ce soir. See Monica, an other use of "péter"! I told you, one word, 13 meanings ;).

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  3. Ah the missing Chateubriand photo! This looks like a very old statue. His mouth appears to be missing! I like that there are a few bits of green to balance the white/gray statue.

    Guille don't you have some homework to do?!! You got GF here AND over at Lynn's! I should have stopped by here first. A double congrats are definitely in order!

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  4. Tu pètes la forme Guille?! Ben pas moi. I'm just back from the mountains, totally exhausted. I'm going straight to bed!

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  5. I thought you had this the other day- but the photo would not appear! Thank you for re-running it!
    And I like the evening pictures you've had. The light is perfect.
    All of your pictures make me want to move as soon as possible.
    Anyone have a job for an English teacher?

    Karen

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  6. Quand on va au ski on a pas le droit de se plaindre! ;) Sleep tight.
    He he thanks Katie. I'm currently working, why don't you trust me?... :)

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  7. I'm a newcomer to the site. This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing your photos. Makes me miss Paris.

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  8. Hello newcomer Justin.

    Eric, so where is this bust -- we looked all over the internet for it. Can you give us a cross rue?

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  9. Welcome back Eric! Hope you found your cell phone.

    Nice to finally make acquaintance with Monsieur Chateaubriand!

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  10. Guille, you said "snowing in Paris and the sky was white"? Unbelieveable! I told my boyfriend, Alain, and he said, WHAT! He didn't believe it. It is very warm here in San Francisco -- at least in Twin Peaks. The waves are hardly even crashing on the rocks, the ocean is very still. I could get a sun tan on my terrace. It is very hot on my terrace right now. Wasn't I the one who said Paris and SF weather are similar? duh

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  11. Guille, you know I like to learn, so in this case, what exactly does péter mean?

    (PS: Did you get an answer from Lynn the other day when you asked about the postcard? I never got mine too...)

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  12. I'm trying to ignore the information Guille just gave us about the fact that it's snowing in Paris in spring... if the weather is that crazy, summer will actually start when? September??

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  13. Of the people Chateaubriand influenced, I understand the Beatles are right up there.

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  14. Or october Monica! I was in suburb to my parents and it snowed there, maybe the weather was too "hot" in Paris to snow (it's often 2 or 3 degrees more)but I know that the snow was falling almost everywhere in France so...and I remember last year, I had my first lunch outside the 2nd of April, by 24 degrees. :S
    (No answer from LYnn...hum hum.)
    About "péter", in this case it means that I'm a little bit overexcited and in a good shape. I guess. (2.00am, my overexcitation is still here but I have to sleep!)

    Lois, well finally the weather is definitely not the same! But it's unusual. I envy you, I want to put away my warm clothes and to wear my summer clothes!

    Holy smoke, crazy country!

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  15. Guille, I sent you and email with two photos of my view from my terrace. Keep warm!

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  16. Guille thanks for the explanation.
    About the postcard, I guess Lynn has some explanning to do...!

    I know the weather is crazy everywhere. But come on, it's got to be hot in Paris in July at least. I'm sure you'll be able to wear your summer clothes them. For me, it was the perfect temperature, I even got a tan from staying outdoors all day. And when I had a pause, I'd go to the fountain outside the Louvre, streched my legs in front of it and just lay there feeling the cool breeze and admiring the pyramid.

    Good times...! :)

    Bon nuit, have a nice day at school tomorrow.

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  17. really? filet mignon is a thick cut from a tenderloin.. wooo.. now i know..hehe..

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  18. Awwwwwwwww... I'm disappointed. After "meat" Chateaubriand I really expected a close up on a plate of food somewhere cool and intimate in the 6th ;)

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  19. I love all the twisty branches in the background - and when I enlarged the photo, it looked like a little bird was to the left of Monsieur Chateaubriand, but I think it's just some dried leaves.

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  20. I forgot to say, Welcome Home, Eric!

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  21. Interesting history on steak and a guy named Frank! Nice to finally put a face to a "filet mignon." I've often wondered. :-) Thanks and welcome back, Eric!

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  22. Welcome home, Eric! I hope you're exhausted in a good way.

    You're welcome, Lois. I know how it feels to put up something on the web and hope for a good reaction!

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  23. Nice to be back to see the photos Eric, but I have to say, from sunny and warm Barcelona to cold and snowy Paris makes it hard!

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  24. Lois, I didn't get your email!:(
    Thanks my dear Monica, have a good day too...

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  25. That's what I love about Paris, around every corner there's something interesting with a story to tell. Thank you for todays !!!

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  26. Don't know who he was, but I love the steak!!

    Hope you all have a lovely day!

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  27. I, too, am in a suburb of Paris, and woke up to the ground covered in snow. Gah!

    Louis--I lived in San Fran for 3 years, and now live in France, and I don't think the weather is overly similar. (Now you've got me missing the fog rolling over the Headlands!)

    And Monica--this past year, it seemed that summer didn't start until late August. We had two hot days right around Bastille Day in July, but other than that, it rained and was cold nearly all summer long.

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  28. Lois, FYI, If I remember well, this bust is located off La rue du Bac, in a little public garden called Square de La Rochefoucauld.

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  29. I like your post, Eric. I like the amount of detail you always include that makes the post interesting to people like me.

    I know "filet mignon" very well. It is the meat I can't afford to eat. LOL

    Nice post, Eric.

    I did one on these things you often see when you look back over your shoulder.

    Abraham Lincoln in Brookville, Ohio

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  30. Lois: I want to see your pictures too!! Can I? :)

    sunshine@oland.com

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  31. In my opinion Chateaubriand only reason to deserve that bust was his contribution to French Romanticism and the way it influenced others to use emotion in literature.
    He was a confused man who often changed his politicals views or his allegiance if things didn't go according to his arrogant wishes. He was also a womaniser who ruined the reputation of young women including the daughter of the pastor who had offered him a place to stay while he was starving.
    And so on... not a nice man.

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  32. Abraham
    I prefer the porterhosue steak. It has the advantage of having some very tenderloin and at the same time has the bone bit to add those delicious flavours that only bone can!
    Oh...I m hungry now!

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  33. Eeek the postcards! I'm sorry, they are on their way. I've been remiss in this postcard-sending business i know and my apologies to all the lovely girls. You will get them soon. Eeeek. Again.


    So who was right about guessing the picture in the first missing posting? I think actually it was me, naturally? ;) Watch those sparks fly!........

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  34. I am hearing that the Olympic torch has been extinguished by officials in Paris today, due to disruption by Tibetan protestors. We had the same thing yesterday here in London though the torch managed to stay alight. Is this right, Eric? We have a restriction on tv pictures right now, and are being shown a still of the Eiffel Tower! Perhaps you are out there getting pics for us?

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  35. Okay we have live tv now restored. I can see the Seine mmmm it's lovely to see live Paree quite apart from the demo but we keep getting pushed to the still of the Tower - not wanting us to see the violence i suppose. Can you tell us what's happening, Eric, at all?

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  36. I am more a potato girl but I guess that wouldn't make a very interesting statue hey???

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  37. Lynn: The Swedish media reoprts that it was the police who extinguished (sp?) the torch - twice actually! For saftey reasons I believe.
    French organisations promise to try to disrupt/intervene futher when the torch is taken from the Eiffel Tower ... I guess we'll have to see what happens!

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  38. Oh, and at last they had to take the torch aboard a bus instead of running with it ...

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  39. Chateaubriand is very handsome-even if he is missing half his nose!

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  40. Thanks Alexandra. We still have a news blackout here - no live pics from Paris. Why i wonder? Most unusual. Some wondering if China intercepted, like they banned YouTube. Interesting.

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  41. Once again, I look but don't see. Another reason I love THIS Eric. I've passed the square 1,000's of times (love shopping on rue du Bac)and enjoy looking at the babies in their carriges and people reading and relaxing, but never wandered in. There is also a world class ice cream store on this street, for those who can break away from Bertillion. Down the way a little more is the church that is all about the miracles--don't know the formal name.

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  42. Guille, So, you didn't get my email -- Hmmmm, is your email address: gmilu@msn.com I'm not in my studio right now. I'll re-send the email later -- you'll be asleep though.

    Alexandra, Of course I'll send you the photos. You're in Swenden -- how cool is that! I met the King and Queen of Sweden when they were on their honeymoon in NYC. Sweet couple. We had Champagne (expensive Champagne I might add). You crack me up when you said "Oh, and at last they had to take the torch aboard a bus instead of running with it ..." I'm still laughing. A BUS??!!! Too funny!

    SOJ, I didn't mean the weather -- I meant the temperature -- cold and damp, except for a few warm days here and there. I wear the same type of clothes in Paris as I do in San Francisco.

    oldmanlincoln, You're funny, I laughed out loud when I read, "I know "filet mignon" very well. It is the meat I can't afford to eat."

    Rose, Wow, You really know that character Chateaubriand. Maybe that is why his bust has been neglected -- as people have noticed he is missing a nose and a mouth.

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  43. Lois...the only reason I know about Chateaubriand is because once I got into an argument with my teacher not knowing he was not only an expert in French literature but was also very keen on Chateaubriand as a writer.
    My teacher almost throw a fit when I told him that when Chateaubriand wrote about love he got his inspiration from the love he felt for his wife and that was why he went back to her after 12 years of exile and separation.

    Obviously I learnt a thing or two that day because my teacher went on in a lecture about what a rat Chateaubriand was to his women and how he went back to his wife simply because he was forced too!

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  44. I love the photos Eric posts, but the links are always wonderful, too. I read the Wikipedia link. It gave a rather dry history of Chateaubriand. Rose, I'm enjoying these more impassioned details!

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  45. Lois: Lol. I guess it always seems exotic to people when somebody lives in another place that one has heard a bit about and etc. :) And thank you for the photos (- though they haven't dropped in on my e-mail account yet?)

    Lynn: You are welcome! I have wondered about this phenomenon too - and more and more so these days when all countries seem to be more than happy to sacrifice their values to economic interests (when it comes to China). Scary.

    Rose: I have to agree with Petrea. :) The details are indeed interesting.

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  46. I'll look for that little square, it sounds pretty.

    Don't feel bad about the weather, mes amis. It also snowed this morning here in Minneapolis. To the north about 150 miles, they had more than 12 inches of snow this past weekend. Yikes.

    28 days...

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  47. Lois,I have some troubles with my mailbox...thank you for the second one, I will have it tomorrow!

    Rose, is it me or did you disappear few days?...I missed you!

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  48. Wow Rose, this is just getting better and better. Don't stop now if you know more. I agree with Petrea, the Wikipedia history of Chateaubriand was dry. You are a passionate writer.

    Alexandra, when I get to my studio this evening, I'm going to re-send the photos. I was tired and I must have doooozzzed off last night. I thought I hit the send button -- obviously, I did not. It's not in my out box. The photos are on my laptop at my studio. Right now I am downtown in San Francisco.

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  49. Lois: That's ok. There's no hurry; I just wondered.

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  50. Hello Eric, I was browsing around La boutique, and I happen to see that you are selling the water puddle B&W print -- just because we asked you to. What a surprise! You didn't say anything. Well, to let you know, I bought one (and some others). I was wondering, are these prints signed by the artist? I really would like that. It gives work a sort of authenticity. >^..^<

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  51. Jeff, 28 days for me too! I assume we're counting down to the same thing, Paris!

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  52. Very interesting article about Chateubriend.Gotta love that name.Elaine Cooke

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