Friday, April 18, 2008

Waiting [not on!] for who[m]?


This photo is dedicated to Zsolt and Zannni from Budapest Daily Photo... Why? Because I took this photo last evening (Thursday) in front of... the Paris Hungarian Center, located on the rue Bonaparte in the 6th arrondissement (not exactly the worst address in Paris!). This center is dedicated to the promotion of the Hungarian culture (and language) and I suppose this sculpture was made by a Hungarian artist (but I have found nothing on the web about this). Anyway, I think it's cool they actually put it in front of the building as if it were a real bench. I don't know the lady next to the bronze one ; she just nicely told me "you can take your picture, I don't mind being on a blog!" Nice encounter.

81 comments:

  1. I'm glad she didn't mind, her presence is what really makes the picture. Though I really do like the sculpture...

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  2. Nice shot and cute story! I like that sculpture! I saw a regular-size bronze (?) dog once, in San Francisco. I think we should send it to your bronze lady so she doesn't sit there by herself most of the time.

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  3. Cute story!!

    I take it that this part of Paris is a very, very nice part? I've never been to Paris....Yet! I'm really looking forward to my first visit--whenever that may be!!

    Thanks!

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  4. What a pleasant lady. Nice encounter huh? Ooooh Eric. I like the sculpture very much and think it's much improved with another pretty lady in real life sitting next to it.

    I want a photo dedication too! Can't you find a Cheltenham Centre or a Lynn Centre anywhere in Paree for meeee? lol! Giggle.

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  5. Great photo, and having the woman sitting next to the sculpture gives it real symmetry. I really like the woman's fancy stockings!

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  6. Too funny, Lynn wants a photo dedication. I've seen these life sized bronzes in San Francisco too. They are always sitting out front of antique or objects d'art shops. There sure are a lot of San Franciscan's blogging here. 6th arrondissement is nice I think. I wouldn't mind living there on a quiet street of course.

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  7. Saint-Germain-des-Prés is an area of the 6th arrondissement. A lot of students are there. I do business with a couple art galleries there. There are a lot of painters there. I buy my art supplies there, paint and canvas, etc. It is a little crazy at night. I stay there sometimes.

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  8. I'm sure I've passed by this one, but can't place her in my mind.

    There's another kind of 'real-life' sculpture this reminds me of - at Les Halles where there's a bunch of steps with a rollerblader and someone with a dog, and others, which is nice in that rather dodgy and uncomfortable melting pot of disaffected humanity - if you have ever be explurged from that looonnnnggggg escalator that leads out from the deep RER A, B and D, you'll know what I mean.

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  9. I hope that you gave that very accommodating woman your blog address. I find the photo quite amusing.

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  10. Seward Johnson (grandson of the founder of the Johnson & Johnson corporation) does lifelike bronze statues like that, which can be found in many cities in the United States (and, who knows, maybe in the world, I am not sure.)

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  11. Eric did you remember me when you passed by Rue Bonaparte??!!!!

    Remember I stayed at this street last year? I can't help feeling like this area was like... home! I loved staying there, it is a fantastic neighborhood. A few steps up and you bump into St.Germain des Pres, a few steps down and your strolling by the Seine. Everyday I passed by a sign next to Les Deux Magots with the names of Simone de Beauvoir and Sartre and I used to drop by quickly at Monoprix...I miss it...


    The photo is so cute! Here we have lots of sculptures like this in the streets or sitting on benches as if they were real.

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  12. That is quite a piece of sculpure on that bench.

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  13. Hi Eric,

    A quick correction here:

    Your title should have been (1) "Waiting For Who" instead of (2) "Waiting On Who" because the latter means to serve someone.

    (1) Je lui attend
    (2) Le monsieur dans unrestaurant

    :)

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  14. I think it should have been "Waiting for Whom?" but I won't quibble.

    I adore this photo. The lady makes it, doesn't she?

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  15. Petrea, I laughed out loud -- you are funny. Argg! It's English class! I really didn't like English class. Actually, I hated it. Anyway, Lynn said that English and French are merging. I'm going to go with that.

    This photo is adorable. The woman looks so anxious clutching her phone with that expression on her face.

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  16. Photolicious, you mean "waiting for whom?" right? ;)


    (PontGirl, Petra, Lynn, I responded to your comments on yesterday's thread)

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  17. Ooooops... Oh, shoot, I'm too late ... Probably should have read the entire string of comments before responding, uh...

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  18. Brilliant! I'm glad she was cool about you taking her pic. I agree with the others. Her presence really does make the shot.

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  19. Oh, I'm just waiting. Waiting for Godot...

    I don't recall the Hungarian Center. Is it near Place St.Sulpice? Hmm. I love the sculpture. I'll look for it.

    I think, however, there is a plaque on a wall, on rue Bonaparte or rue de Seine, that says Eduard Manét was born there. You can't lose wandering around in that vicinity. I love it. If I was a rich man...

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  20. Oh, I forgot: Enjoy your visit with the other bloggers. A bientot.

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  21. Great story...and there is a Laduree on the rue Bonaparte also...mmmmmm...lot's of Macarons!!

    tomate, pont girl, petrea...I am going to a dinner at Fleur de Lys on the 28th..so I will fill you in!! LOL!!

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  22. I think it should have read, "Waiting for this guy with a camera to take the damn photo!"

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  23. This is just so charming. Lovely photo and story.

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  24. Thank you Eric for this nice present:)

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  25. I love this photo! Your perspective makes it just right.

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  26. Eh, which of the sitters is the sculpture?

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  27. The bench, the figures, the fence, the expressions, the colors, the light - all delightful.

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  28. I like a lot this photo; The sculpture is so expressive (storm in her mind or sadness or ?... we can think of many things). The real lady besides is very friendly and cool. That makes the contrast.
    Hungary, are you planned to go there for your next vacation (if I am not wrong, it is coming soon, after the PDP picnic!)

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  29. I really like this photo. The sculpture is beautiful, but the picture wouldn't be the same without the real lady next to/on it. She (the real one) looks kind of outworn and anxious, but she's very pretty at the same time.
    Maybe she just spend too much money in this expensive neighbourhood or maybe she's been stood up or maybe ....

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  30. Eric, tell us the truth...that lady there was picked specially for this photo. They make a great pair.

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  31. Christie, I can understand that you're looking forward to your first visit to Paris - and there's a lot to look forward to.
    BUT I have to warn you - PARIS is addictive !!! It goes into your blood like a bug or a virus and there's only one cure for it : another trip to the greatest city in the world.
    So take care before you go there for the first time, it will hit you.

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  32. oh what a surprise to see a hungary related post here. im a hungarian in paris. :-)

    i really like this one as well.

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  33. I smiled, big, when I saw this on the portal, and was, honestly, a bit disappointed that the gal on the left was art. I had thought it was a real live person seated next to another real life person. The difference in apparel seemed like a classic. I still like it though.

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  34. No Rose, I swear, she's not a model! I was passing there on my way to place Saint Sulpice to take another photo and I got caught by this scene.

    I gave her a card, it would be cool if she would post a note here!

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  35. It would be very cool indeed. Please do, lady with the gorgeous stockings?

    Petrea yes i agree Waiting For Whom? Still as Lois says, we're merging, you hear that Eric? You and me, talking the same lingo. What about that? The French shrink in horror at the thought but as an English lady i am delighted.

    By the descriptions from Lois and Monica of this area, it is clear this is Lynnland. So suitable for me, oh yes i really think so. When i win the lottery, i shall buy my apartment in the 6th arondissement for sure. That is where i want to be, i have decided. Art materials on tap, a few steps to the Seine, peaceful surroundings.... not too shabby for Lynn ...! Oh yes.

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  36. Lynn this area, rue Bonaparte included is full of art galleries, so yes! It is definetely the place for you!!!

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  37. Not 'waiting on' - waiting *for*!

    Nice photo :-D

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  38. One never feels lonely in New Orleans because there are similar bronze sculptures on the park benches there. Your picture is just lovely!

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  39. I really like that sculpture and the real lady seems very nice from your story! Mabye she will visit your blog to see your photo?

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  40. Yes, it would be nice if the bonne femme in the photo paid us a visit. But if she does, I think she's going to wish she'd run a comb through her hair!

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  41. lol yes Shutterspy, 'waiting on' is American English, 'waiting for' is English. We can all see where Eric learned his English! Or perhaps he just has a lot of American friends!

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  42. Talking of our 'merging', Eric, i've been doing quite a bit of Paris advertising myself over the last ten days. By not visiting Cheltenham, though, you've missed the lot! he he.

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  43. Sorry, Lynn, but most Americans say "waiting for". There are regional differences, of course, and some Yanks say "waiting on", but it is not the norm.

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  44. Expat
    If she does, she shouldn't. I hope she will not. She is a very stylish lady with a very good sense of dress.

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  45. Yes, Lynn, I never heard the expression "waiting on" used in that way until Mick Jagger sang it in "I'm not waiting on a lady, I'm just waiting on a friend."

    Or was it "waiting for a friend"?

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  46. eric,
    you always ask permission + provide explainations about the blog before taking a picture!
    yaooooo it should not be easy all the time!
    bye

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  47. I never ask permission for anything! LOL.

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  48. Oooh well that's interesting, Jeff and Petrea. When i was teaching English as a foreign language, we always had to do an American/English session and this was one of the examples. I stand corrected of course and don't profess to be an expert in American, i do know it's not English though!

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  49. Where's Michael when we need him for another opinion? Tsk, he's jetting around somewhere, the lucky devil. Come back Michael! We're waiting for you! lol.

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  50. i like your blog...
    nice lady too...
    beautiful sculpture.

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  51. Waiting for, waiting on... In fact I got puzzled by a book that I've been reading for years (yes it's pretty tough!) by the French philosopher Simone Weil (you probably never heard of her, even though she's an interesting lady).

    Anyway, one day, I think I was in England (Lynn!!) waiting FOR a plane or something and... I looked for a book to buy. My eyes got caught by a book by Simone Weil (in English of course since I was in England) called "Waiting on God".

    The funny thing is that I looked for it on the web and guess what I found as many occurrences on "Waiting on God" than on "Waiting for God"... So I must have gotten it TOTALLY wrong!

    Also, as Photolicious said, maybe this Wainting on God, meant Serving God and not waiting for him. Which makes sense because she was a great believer.

    Anyway, I'm in Romans now, for the Internet Festival - you know the one I attended last year and where I got the second prize in the Photoblog category - Only this year I'm a member of the jury (not in the photo category, but the travel blog one).

    It cold and rainy, but that is another story...

    Will be checking regularly, thanks to the Wi-Fi connection ;)

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  52. Oh good luck as a juror, Eric!

    Well i suppose it depends where the translation of the book was done! he he what a mystery. All i know is that if you said Waiting on... in England, you would be serving someone. he he.

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  53. "But that is not the question. Why are we here, that is the question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the answer. Yes, in this immense confusion one thing alone is clear. We are waiting for Godot to come."

    - Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

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  54. What a great shot - I'll have to go there and kiss her, too - just liked I kissed le poisson on Le Pont Alexandre!!

    I really like the sculpture's anklet, and I equally like the real woman's stockings!

    Have a great time at Fleur de Lys, Tonton - I loved it! You are right, Tomate, it is insanely expensive there, but it sure is fun to have an exotic treat every once in a great while!

    Have a great time being a juror, Eric - it sounds like a lot of fun - and I can't believe a whole year has gone by since we were voting like mad for our dear PDP to win!!

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  55. I love this picture. The ladies have many differences. But hey are both classy and quite chic. Bravo, to their style.

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  57. I learnt at least one thing today: I learnt that Simone Veil was not Simone Weil! I didn't know yours Eric. She seems to be very interesting according to the few things I read about her on the web... à approfondir!

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  58. I agree with you Guille!!! At first, I thought of Simone Veil but I know she is not a great believer at all and I was sure Eric could not make this mistake (Weil instead of Veil...). So I requested both Mr. Google and Mr. Wikipedia and now everything is clearer to me!
    Eric, FYI, it is rainy and cold enough too in Paris... Member of the jury in the travel blog category : sounds interesting and enjoyable... Great for you!!
    Glad to see you have changed the title by : waiting for who because the question is worth asking by looking at the bronze lady.

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  59. Hello!

    I am Erno from Budapest, Hungary. I like this blog very much. I read it almost every day and I am happy that today I found a Hungarian sculpture here. Eric, merci beaucoup!

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  60. I'm here Lynn, but my opinion won't count much. Written and spoken English are almost as much of a challenge for me as French seems to be. I honestly (don't yell at me Eric) hardly ever read the photo title! I'm right into the photo, the caption, and bien sur, the comments.

    After living in England, when my French colleagues ask me to clarify an English question, I often can't remember if it's the English or American explanation I'm supposed to give, so this title doesn't surprise me at all.

    Anyway, I love the photo and am proud of you Eric for giving out your card to this woman. I think that deep down people are interested in being "part of something", so I'm not surprised that she said, "Yes". So, do we know if she saw your photo?

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  61. I am the No-model of eric...I was just "there",in a pure instant of being...and waiting for the purity of the present; the magic of fate is that life gives the presence of eric at the right moment for this magic photo! thanks eric for your feline capture of this artistic picture !

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  62. When thinking about street photography I'm sure there are PEOPLE, who make the picture. Eric, this shot is oustanding: both because the monument is excellent and your coincidental model fits it perfectly. That is funny in life - you can just sit on the bench and suddenly someone comes takes a picture and you become a face of the day on the blog reading by bloggers all around the world!

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  63. Love your blog and your photos! This is the best "daily city photo" blog that I view.

    BTW, your heading should read "Waiting for whom" (not who) - sorry, but I'm a grammar teacher and couldn't help it :)

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  65. Oh - and from this speaker of average, ugly American English, "waiting on" something/someone is perfectly normal, everyday usage. As in: "I'm waitin' on grandma to git up off the couch cuz we're fixin' to git on over to WalMart." :)

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  66. Oh ritalounge, you put it so perfectly! And LOOK! The model is here with us! I'm so glad you wrote and put a "voice" with your lovely photo!

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  67. M.K. could you PLEASE explain to all of us the rules?! I'm never quite sure and I know that there are a lot of non-native English speakers here who would like to know as well.

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  68. Oh my! Well, which rules would you prefer? I'll begin with Eric's lovely phrase. Both "for" and "on" are prepositions. "Whom" is the object of that preposition. Since it's an object, it must be in the objective case. Whom is the objective case (to whom, by whom, for whom, above whom - you get the idea). "Who" would be used in places where a nominative case pronoun is required, like "Who is coming to supper?" or "Who ate my piece of cake?" Oh, sorry - it's almost supper time here.

    All you posters here sound as if you have perfectly fine English. I'm still struggling to figure out the French instructions on Eric's blog site :)

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  69. Eric - I failed to say how much I like this particular photo. I know NOTHING about photography. But I accidentally clicked on the picture, and enlarged it on my screen. So, I decided to slowly examine it, from the toes up (my apologies to the fine lady who posed). It is a study in contrasts. The poses, textures, substance, expressions - all seem opposites. The living woman looks away at life; the sculpture is introspective. Knowing that one is made of metal, and one is living flesh and blood -- it is fascinating. Thanks.

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  70. Wow M.K....I now know exactly WHY I don't the rule. That sounds complicated to remember! ;-)

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  71. This is good. I love the real woman and the sculpture similarities and contrasts...

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  72. Is this sculpture/bench near the Latin Quarter or the Louvre? It looks familiar, like I saw it when I was in Paris last Oct.

    I SOOOOOOO want to go back to Paris. It really makes the States (United) look like a total cultural wasteland! And disgustingly FAT. Look at me, I'm a snob against my own country! - but it's true! ;)

    Oui, j'adore Paris! :)

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  73. Yay! You changed the title!

    Some people in England say 'waiting on' but it's incorrect and means 'serving'.

    And I think 'whom' is correct, as Petrea said :)

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  74. PS I wish I could get so many people to read my photoblog! :-D

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  75. I've been waiting for long time to visit Paris, but eventually I've realized how wrong I was, thinking of the city and it's cold walls, sad streets and miserable sculptures.

    I miss the the real woman ...

    ata

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  76. I just love, love, love, the casual imitation created by the real lady
    next to the sculpture. I want to say, "Get up, it is my turn to sit there!"

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  77. Amazing site! Continue the good posts.

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  78. Oh, Thank you Eric! We just found this post you dedicated to us today :) Very happy that the lady was so friendly and nice to you!
    Zannnie and Zsolt
    http://www.BudapestDailyPhoto.com

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  79. Oh, I like that very much! Thanks for adding the link to the recent blog!

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