Thursday, November 24, 2005

Happy Thanksgiving


For obvious reasons we do not celebrate Thansgiving (le Merci donnant !) in France. And though, due to the quite large number of Americans living in Paris, there is a place in the 4th arrondissement precisely called Thanksgiving that is not only a caterer but also a restaurant (with Cajun specialties). Needless to say that you do not hear too much French speaking in this place! Now, isn't it the perfect time for me to wish a happy Thanksgiving to my American visitors and to thank you all for the nice feedback you give me on Paris Daily Photo.

22 comments:

  1. Cajun specialties ? Miam ! Did you go to this restaurant ? Is it good ? I would like to taste, I like the cajun food.
    And what's the adress, precisely ?

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  2. Been there...The prices are very high, and we were disappointed to find such a limited number of products from home. Happy, though, to see "Sleepy Time Tea" (Celestial Seasons) for somewhere around 4.50 euros. Still, it's worth a trip if you have a hankering for peanut butter, pop tarts (I think), and other hard-to-find products from home. I guess I'm not impressed with the place precisely because I have NOT had a hankering for anything from home since we arrived here four months ago...!

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  3. Never been to the restau, though...Just to the store...And the menu looks just great!

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  4. Eric--

    I am thankful for the pictures you post each day. It's part of my morning ritual, cafe et photo blog. I hope to visit Paris in June (a lifelong dream)and your pictures and commentary have provided wonderful insight.

    Merci.

    Elisabeth

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  5. Happen to come here thru the konfabulator widget, love your blog! I wish that widget could show previous photos though... Sits on my desktop anyway ;)

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  6. i'm thankful for your pictures every day. i lived in france as a teenager and my family still lives there (i would type my comment in french but i make way too many mistakes now). i don't get to visit as often as i would like so your pictures are very welcome.

    even though my parents are both french, my mother used to cook a turkey every thanksgiving even in france. she'd have to order the turkey weeks before from the butcher.

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  7. Eric - Your Paris, One Photo a Day blog is one thing that I am very grateful to have found this year. I visit it daily, it is at the top of my blogroll. Thank you for making my morning brighter everyday.

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  8. Merci bien, monsieur. I just recently found your website, but it has already become a treasured part of my daily routine.

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  9. Thanks for the Thanksgiving wish. When I lived in Paris, that store was my source for all things American. It's amazing how much you miss Macaroni and Cheese when you're living away from the US...

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  10. Although there is a lot of good products and meals in the US, I never understood why Americans miss home products so much when they are abroad. Especially when they are staying in France! The quality and diversity of products is way, way better over there.

    JM-

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  11. Hey Eric,

    Great choice of a photo today. Who would have thought?! I actually have used this place to cater my thanksgiving dinner the last 6 years. All of my French friends love the chance to eat stuffed turkey, cranberry sauce and have "seconds".

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  12. JM: it’s human nature. The grass is always greener on the other side. And people tend to cherish
    what spells “home” to them.

    Eric: thank you for that picture! As far as I'm concerned, I didn't think you'd come up with something like in Paris that in a million years! Nice touch! Excellent :-)

    I am, too, thankful for your blog, discovered a few months ago while checking out Elisabeth's
    links.

    I grew up in Paris and left for the States at approximately this time of the year ... back during the beginning of the Reagan Administration. Now, I have spent more years of my life in the States
    than I had in France and I guess I have become “American” in the process in more ways than one
    ... (didn’t vote for the current President, though!). Anyway, thank you for making people like me
    (all over the world) feel welcome on your blog!

    We understand what it takes to keep the blog running and we are all (including those who are too shy to comment) totally thankful for your efforts and your creativity.

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  13. I just returned home to Chicago last week after a month in Paris. I found your blog late one night while on the net trying to get over jet lag...
    Your exquisite images, witt & wisdom has been a marvelous help to get me through this awful empty feeling Francophiles have after leaving Paris.
    Guess that is why you make my top ten of things-to-be-thankful-for this year.
    This daily fix of the city of my heart keeps me going ' til I can get back there!
    Merci mille fois!
    Therese-Marie

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  14. Gee, that is really good to hear. Thanks very much everybody; all these nice compliments help continue for - as you noticed it Tomate - it is a real commitment to post a picture everyday - even though as I already mentioned it - I do not actually take them everyday but during my - scarce! - free time.

    In the coming months I hope to go a little further and offer prints but again, this takes time to organise!

    Again thank you very much, enjoy you Thanksgiving weekend - if you have one!

    PS : Jamez mentioned the Paris Daily Photo widget - a cool "gadget" made by Frédéric, a work acquaintance. I’ll tell you more about it this weekend.

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  15. ça ne me semble pas bizarre que les français ne fêtes pas Thanksgiving, ce "merci donnant" (qui mériterait d'être d'ailleurs éclairci : voir ce repas était consitué pour faire signer aux "native americans" comme on dit les actes de possessions des terres, suivi d'un ...). Non, qu'en penses-tu ?

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  16. > Jimmy. Ben non effectivement ce n'est pas bizarre puisque la France n'a connu ni de Mayflower ni de pélerins!! C'est ce que j'ai dit dans le commentaire non ? ;))

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  17. oups, oui, c'est mon côté provocateur qui a dérapé voulant mettre le point sur un fait historique plutôt bizarre et finalement pas très joyeux d'après ce que j'ai compris ie repas uniquement dans le but de signer des contrats de ventes de terres et pas dans le but de remercier. Ceci dit, ces sources sont peut-être fausse... difficile de trouver la vérité sur le sujet.
    Pour info, moi aussi, j'aime beaucoup ton blog, tes remarques sont très interessante, assez dégagées, parfois insolites avec une touche d'humour.

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  19. Hello ! .! Happy Thanksgiving!!!! :) :) :) :) :)
    Thanksgiving is 1 of my favorite holidays, and each year I like to get into the mood-extend the holiday, when it were-by reading "Thanksgiving novels." And in addition, all these stories are mostly about families, about coming together to heal old hurts and showing thanks for the gift of love. .. .. - --
    Have You Been Currently Better Off These days Than You Were 4 Yrs Ago?

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