Monday, November 24, 2008

Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé


You must know it since their marketing is now worldwide, the 2008 Beaujolais Nouveau has arrived! Beaujolais is a region above Lyon (the second third largest city in France) which former capital was Beaujeu and which is known for its wine. Every third Thursday of November since the 1950's they produce a special Nouveau wine that is supposed to be drunk a few weeks after the grapes have been harvested (you'll find the whole story, and much more in here). Every year it's a big event and cafés and restaurants take advantage of it to boost their business. I took this photo yesterday at the Zephyr Café, on Les Grands Boulevards. As for the quality of this Beaujolais Nouveau, I let you fight over it in the comments box!!

58 comments:

  1. Wowza - le Beaujolais nouveau est arivee!! Great photo - I really love how that bottle looks 10 feet high!! Pour me a glass please, as I'm at work on a Sunday!!

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  2. OMG, I just this SECOND got an e-mail from a friend in NYC saying he's drinking Beaujolais right now! Oh, upon further study, that bottle looks 20 feet high!!

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  3. Katie -- were you lurking or lucky? Either way, you are GF today!
    Just for the record, I would have no trouble with a crown that comes with assembly instructions (unless they're in Swedish!).
    And Eric, where can I get a bottle of Beaujolais Nouveau in this large economy size?

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  4. Alexa I seem to be lucky on the weekends when I'm stuck at work! And I plan on putting Beaujolais corks all over my crown, after I happily start passing bottles around for us all to share. Cheers!

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  5. What a great picture. Is this a normal bottle shot at a superb angle or really a huge promotional one?!

    I can't fight in the comments box as I haven't tried this Beaujolais. I'd like a glass though...

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  6. I can't fight about it either, Eric as like Lynn I've never tried it. If you'd like to throw some other subject my way I will do my best . . .

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  7. LOL! From Cali what a good idea. What shall we pick out of this piece - French cafes, weird angle photography, the fifties, what? lol!

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  8. Just a small correction:
    Lyon is now the third largest city of France (Marseille is the second one).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyon

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  9. Thanks for sharing your photos !

    bchrisphotos.blogspot.com

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  10. I wish I'd seen your comment sooner, Lynn. I am sure you are tucked into bed by now. I am no fan of the 50s. How's that for a mild start?

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  11. I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best*. In this case, Lafite or Pichon Laland. As for Beaujolais Nouveau, I have yet to try.

    Tchin-Tchin!


    * Oscar Wilde

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  12. How did you do it Eric? Between the snow storm we had and the freezing temperatures (I promise I'm not exaggerating!), you went out and took this photo? Just for us? Thanks.

    As for Beaujolais Nouveau, I prefer it only in the summer when it's served cold. But on the 25th, I'll gladly have a glass with the PDPrs coming for dinner.

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  13. I first heard of Beaujolais Nouveau about 12 years ago. At first I did not understand what the big deal was, now I understand it represents the first wines of the recent vintage. It always goes well with turkey - a good wine for us Americans on our Thanksgiving.

    Snow in Paris - how wonderful! Hopefully the city comes to a stop and even the residents can enjoy with white stuff covering everything.

    Carrie - I have been enjoying your daily post of what you are doing, seeing, enjoying. I hope you have had a good time the past few days too - and got to play in the snow too

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  14. Many don't like it. I like when it arrives, for fun. It's not the greatest wine, and the price has increased by a dollar every year, though other French wines have not. I can't find my favorite Nouveau anymore: Louis Tete. It almost has a bit of bubbly spark to it.

    I would love to attend the gathering on the 25th. Unfortunately, I would not be able to make it back to bring ma mere to Thanksgiving dinner at my brother's house. So, I will text a bonjour to you instead!

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  15. I didn't know about Beaujolais Nouveau until my brother introduced me to it. It's been a while, but as I remember, I liked it. As Christina SEA mentioned it puts me in mind of Thanksgiving, and dashing about San Francisco with my brother to find it when it came out.

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  16. Eric, it looks like your camera was parked on the paving stones for this one! Its a great fall feel! It makes me want to go in and have a glass. I'd forgotten that Thanksgiving and the Beaujolais were coming (I think I blocked it out because it means I'll have to leave soon). The only time I have it is at Thanksgiving.

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  17. Yesterday I hit another wall, so, I took it easy & then crashed. I went back to the Pantheon and then next door into St. Etienne du Mont, a small church where the tomb (memorial?) of St. Genevieve is (she died in 502). She rallied the Parisians when Attila the Hun was attacking and became patron saint to the City that Floats But Does Not Sink.

    Its an architectural mish mash, but I love the way I feel there. The whole interior is very white. Overhead there are narrow, lacy, white stone Renaissance catwalks hanging midair between the the massive, Gothic, grey stone columns and walls, with items made of rich, brown wood here and there around the church.

    Before going in,I watched the snow swirl in front of the Pantheon and St. Etienne. Centuries ago a procession arrived at the very same spot when rains had decimated the city for three months straight and the people made their way there to ask for intercession.

    After warming myself with a glass of vin chaud, I continued on to the Tour de Jean Sans Peur on the rue Etienne Marcel in the 3d. There was a photo exhibit on Mont St. Michel and lots of info on the construction and history of the tower and on Jean.

    The 5 story tower is all that remains of a building once intersected by Phillipe Augustus' wall around the city. Jean was cousin to the King's brother, the duc d'Orleans, who was getting in Jean's way! Jean had him killed, not far off in the rue des Arbaletriers (which looks much as it did then). It caused a civil war contributing to the problems of the 100 Years War.

    An historical novel that begins with this incident is called "In a Dark Wood Wandering" and the introduction tells the amazing story of it's translation into English - a tale in itself. The last time I was here I got to see where the duc was killed; this time I walked in the home of the man who killed him, still standing some six hundred years after the fact......

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  18. Lynn -- I just have to tell you that it happened again yesterday (and I'd taken off my onions)! I was sitting in St Etienne and there were tons of school kids in the church at the time. Two little ten year old girls walked up to me and one excused herself and asked me if I had a church calendar (why me? - why a church calendar? - I don't know!!).

    I was giving my well practiced furrowed brow look, which is precursor to me saying "Sorry I didn't understand anything you just said", when I realized that I did understand her. But before I could say a thing, the other little girl, seeing my brow, jumped to the wrong conclusion and, thinking it was they who weren't making sense, explained that they just wanted to know when St Genevieve's Feast Day was going to be.

    Smiling kindly (mostly because I figured I might get away with not looking like an idiot once again!), I said sorry I did not have one, and off they trundled.... while I sat there smugly happy at my tiny moment of victory and comforted by the fact that I at least had been able to decieve a pair of children!! :)

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  19. Beaujolais nouveau est yucky.
    The End

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  20. Since we're (sort of) on the subject of cafes, I thought this article from Saturday's NY Times was interesting but also sad. Eric, is this really such a problem?

    Carrie -- really enjoyed your comment about visiting St.-Etienne-du-Mont. When I lived in Paris, my last apt. there was about a block away, on the place de l'Ecole Polytechnique. It's such a beautiful church, and mostly overlooked, despite being just behind the Pantheon.

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  21. I JUST NOTICED Michael's comment on snow in CDG!!!!!!
    With apologies to Caillebotte and Signac.....YUCKY again!!!! I hate snow(especially the yellow kind) or should I say I hate the cold that goes with it! Good thing I grew up in MIA and live in PHX, I guess.

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  22. Carrie, wow wow wow. Every day, from your tales of adventure, I add to my "Paris to-do list." Merci.

    PHX, maybe my memory's wrong? Maybe I didn't like Beaujolais Nouveau...

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  23. OMG - Carrie.....i had a similar experience when i lived in paris - its that moment when the light bulb goes and you can say "i understand what you are saying"! YEAH!!!! mine unfortunately was a man who wanted to know what time it was, unfortunately, it took me a while to compose my response, although i had the biggest smile for the rest of the day.

    eric - i love this foto.... you make me want to return my ikea kitchen and use the money to buy a plane ticket.

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  24. This is SUCH an AMAZING blog! I am so excited to have found it. I used to live in Le Vesinet and work in Saint Germain en Laye. I try to get back to Paris once a year and see new things. I will be leaving for Paris this Wednesday and can't wait to see some of your awesome suggestions.

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  25. Once again, our hearts are beating as one. We went to a Beaujolais Nouveau celebration at the Left Bank Restaurant in San Jose this weekend! I highly recommend the Left Bank.

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  26. Oh no the Beaujo Nouveau has arrived! I agree that if you like the BN, drink it for Thanksgiving or Christmas holidays. It needs to be consumed shortly after production...that's the intrigue I guess. If you hold onto it for a year or more, it's going to lose its quality. It's not my favorite wine, but I like the tradition behind it. Of course, I favor my holiday tradition with The Macallan and a fireplace and the snow falling. lol

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  27. "snow storm", Michael, LOL, yeah, at least 3 flakes. ;)

    PHX, that's radical!! Fresh during the summer, that's fine with me. And last week at the pub, it was okay too actually. LOL

    That's not what we call a GOOD wine, it's special and people like the event, the tradition. I like it too.

    We'll try it tomorrow guys!

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  28. Carrie - how funny. Again! I'm glad you told the story. I think maybe it's because you might have a kind, approachable face? Who knows. How curious. At least you're meeting lots of new people through it and using your French!

    From Cali yes I was in bed, but only just. Had I known, I might have flung off my nightshirt, kicked my Teddy bear out of bed, pulled off my wee winkie hat and sat at the laptop once again!

    I'm not a huge fan of the fifties either, in terms of fashion nor lifestyle really. Though I sigh wistfully at the good manners. I prefer the sixties for fashion, definitely. The backcombed hair, the eyeliner, the little pumps, short straight dresses, and those horribly clingy shiny boots - or was that last one just me? I was only 9. lol.

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  29. Holy doughnuts, Batman! Lynn, now you really look like my twin! I thought I was looking at myself.

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  30. Today was a late start. I had to get my camera fixed, and luckily found a shop where the owner spoke English - I daren't think how I'd have explained the problem!

    Once done, I went to see the great Gates to the City - the Porte St. Denis and the Porte St. Martin, only blocks from each other. They must have been truly awesome when they weren't surrounded by 6 story apartment buildings, like the cathedrals must have been when surrounded by small dwellings and farms.( In the event I got a good dose of the Sentier, and that during the day - now I know what you mean Guille!)

    Then I went to the Left Bank's Arenes de Lutece, a 2d C. Roman arena of incredibly even stonework complete with sand in the center, perfect for an afternoon petanque game. There were two groups playing and the good natured haranguing that seems to be a necessary (and I think, endearing) part of the game was in full fledge. I watched and after some pleasantries, one of the older gentlemen came over and began to talk to me.

    Under huge white clouds and it being a lovely afternoon, he warmed to his topic and began to tell me in great detail about the glory of the French empire. He went on with nearly spiritual fervor about the wonders of the French language, music, art, philosophy, food, women and numerous other things French. He even recited poetry to me! It was all quite charming.

    But, after about 25 minutes (of which I must say, I understood nearly all), I had to leave for the Jardin des Plantes. So, I excused myself and he was thoroughly regaled by his friends to make sure I'd be shown the way to the gates. So off we went, and when we got there he told me I must keep loving France!

    The Jardin des Plantes was pleasant with an overlook knoll reached through a winding path. But, as it began to get dark and rain, my umbrella broke, causing one of those practical adventures that led me to have to walk somewhere south of the equator in search of an umbrella. Of course it had quit raining by then, but having found one, in Ecuador, I tramped back up the Christmas-lit rue Mouffetard to the Latin Q.

    I stopped near St. Severin church for a hot drink and soon two girls, art and architecture students, tried their English out on me. We spent a fun couple hours laughing and trying to communicate in 3 languages. By the end, one of them had offered to show me her school. So, that adventure awaits on Wed. (We'll see if she shows up to meet me - I'll let you know!)

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  31. Today was a late start. I had to get my camera fixed, and luckily found a shop where the owner spoke English - I daren't think how I'd have explained the problem!

    Once done, I went to see the great Gates to the City - the Porte St. Denis and the Porte St. Martin, only blocks from each other. They must have been truly awesome when they weren't surrounded by 6 story apartment buildings, like the cathedrals must have been when surrounded by small dwellings and farms.( In the event I got a good dose of the Sentier, and that during the day - now I know what you mean Guille!)

    Then I went to the Left Bank's Arenes de Lutece, a 2d C. Roman arena of incredibly even stonework complete with sand in the center, perfect for an afternoon petanque game. There were two groups playing and the good natured haranguing that seems to be a necessary (and I think, endearing) part of the game was in full fledge. I watched and after some pleasantries, one of the older gentlemen came over and began to talk to me.

    Under huge white clouds and it being a lovely afternoon, he warmed to his topic and began to tell me in great detail about the glory of the French empire. He went on with nearly spiritual fervor about the wonders of the French language, music, art, philosophy, food, women and numerous other things French. He even recited poetry to me! It was all quite charming.

    But, after about 25 minutes (of which I must say, I understood nearly all), I had to leave for the Jardin des Plantes. So, I excused myself and he was thoroughly regaled by his friends to make sure I'd be shown the way to the gates. So off we went, and when we got there he told me I must keep loving France!

    The Jardin des Plantes was pleasant with an overlook knoll reached through a winding path. But, as it began to get dark and rain, my umbrella broke, causing one of those practical adventures that led me to have to walk somewhere south of the equator in search of an umbrella. Of course it had quit raining by then, but having found one, in Ecuador, I tramped back up the Christmas-lit rue Mouffetard to the Latin Q.

    I stopped near St. Severin church for a hot drink and soon two girls, art and architecture students, tried their English out on me. We spent a fun couple hours laughing and trying to communicate in 3 languages. By the end, one of them had offered to show me her school. So, that adventure awaits on Wed. (We'll see if she shows up to meet me - I'll let you know!)

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  32. he he Suzy USA twin - I didn't intend that, but it's quite uncanny isn't it? Perhaps it might be good to show yourself on here - though don't worry if you're not comfortable.

    Carrie I'm so enjoying your Parisian adventures! You are certainly being made welcome.

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  33. Alexa -- sad article,but thanks for the link. I've noticed empty cafes here in Paris, but I don't know if its out of the ordinary - I thought it might be the winter coming on, etc. I'm sure the French contingent knows. Sadly, I think peoples' fears may be well founded, but the failure to spend will help to increase the very problem we fear.

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  34. Lynn -- Isn't it great?! I love to tell people who've been led to think the French aren't friendly to Americans!! : )

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  35. Lynn, this is the best twin photo I could make of myself.

    Carrie, the French have always been lovely to me!

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  36. Carrie -- they've always been lovely to me aussi, and I'm glad you're making new friends wherever you go. But you probably have a friendly face and welcoming demeanor yourself!

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  38. Guille - you only got three flakes!!?? That's too bad. :(

    Where I was - I don't know where Michael was - the air was all white with them - beautiful!

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  39. Alexa...Merci for posting the link to the NYTimes article. I also read that over the weekend and realized how an institution that is so strongly associated with the culture of France is in peril. Very sad! They should allow a smoking/non smoking area for cafes perhaps?? I was going to post today also..glad you saw it!

    Beaujolais Nouveau...great tradition and the event is a lot of fun[one of the only times you will see so many Parisians publicly drunk]..but the wine??? Hmmmm...that is a matter of taste. Now with the flics on the arses of those drinking in cafes, one never knows!!

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  40. I just love the blue glow around the moon. Enchanting.

    Alexa, mercy for the link. Yes, I agree, it is a little sad. However, I'm not one of those people who are going to stop going to cafes. I feel so at home in a cafe. I prefer them over a restaurant.

    Zazie cafe in my neighborhood in San Francisco every third Thursday of November they have a Beaujolais night. They have a three course meal with various Beaujolais served with each course. You can sit outside or in. The fixed price is about US$49.00.

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  41. Hey Suzy just look at us! What twinnies we are. Fun huh? How strange. Make a comment next to mine if you can. Ok, yes I'm behaving like a schoolgirl and giggling.

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  42. Eric will be groaning... he's got double the trouble now! LOL.

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  43. You matching cuties are adorable.

    Carrie, more good stuff! Merci.

    Yes, Alexa, Carrie has a friendly face and demeanor. To see her is to want to get to know her. No wonder she's meeting people every day!

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  44. I just read the NY Times article about the cafes. Here in Minnesota, a smoking ban went into effect a few years ago. The first year or so, all we heard and read were complaints from bar owners and smokers. After a year, these complaints came only from the very small and, usually, crummy bars full of drunks. Well, those businesses were hurt. However, the others have experienced a renaissance, as we nonsmokers now enjoy going out again. The bars are doing fine again. Of course, our taverns, bars, small restaurants are not the same as cafes in France, but I think there are some similarities.

    As to the police and drunk driving: the owner of a grungy bar in the city where I work has asked the city council to tell the police to leave his customers alone. In short, he wants his customers to be able to drive drunk without getting arrested!

    P.S. I will bring my Beaujolais Nouveau to the family Thanksgiving dinner and then it will be gone for the year.

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  45. he he I'm really amused by it Petrea! Of course I'm totally kidding myself - Suzy I am sure is half my age - it's amazing what Photoshop can do. Still, it's great fun having a twinnie.

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  46. Well they call it menage a trois, Suzy, don't they, but we are simply menage a deux. We need another. Any takers?

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  47. Half your age? Lynn, I'm a grandmother. OK, a step-grandmother with my much older husband, but still a grandmother!

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  48. LOL you got me going there, Suzy! Wow a grandmother at any age is really something. I'm the mother of a 21 year old, 20 year old and 17 year old so you get the idea. lol! Still, in Photoshop we can be whatever age we want! Let's order two Guinnesses from Guille to that!

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  49. I do feel like a little minx getting up to high jinx here at Eric's place! he he what WILL he say when he sees us. Poor Eric. I fear we shall run rings around him.

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  50. Lynn: I agree with you about 50s lifestyle and fashion. I also miss good manners - my own especially!

    Teddy bear? LOL!

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  51. It's fashionable to knock Beaujo Nouveau as over-hyped nonsense, but it's a seasonal treat I personally look forward to. In the current American vernacular, "It is what it is" -- a fruity concoction that gives a first idea of what the wines of the year will eventually be like when properly fermented.

    This year I don't like either of the DuBoeufs, but the Dupond is delicious. I'm off to stock up for Thanksgiving!

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  52. Bonjour a tous! I do believe I purchased this wine, here in the states at whole foods, because I was most excited to try it. Well, I was deeply disappointed since it tasted like water with a hint of wine.

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