Sunday, February 01, 2009

Theme day: paths or passages


It's February 1st and it's a theme day: Paths and Passages. When I saw this I thought to myself: "For once, that is going to be a piece of cake, I just need to take a photo of Passage Verdeau, where I live". But that would have been too easy... So instead I'm offering you, my favorite passage of Madame Bovary, a French novel my Gustave Flaubert, I'm sure you heard of (and maybe read too). It's when she is still happy and beautiful, before things turn ugly! I love the 19th century French literature. I'm sure the other CDP bloggers will show you real passages or paths in their city, so don't forget to visit them ;-)

47 comments:

  1. And do they ever turn ugly, eh?
    Nice choice for the theme, Eric.

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  2. Interesting take on paths and passages. I do like the passage where you live, but this photo makes me want to break out my dictionary and re-read Madam Bovary!

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  3. Good snag on GF Alexa! That's what I get for actually trying to decipher some of the text in the photo. Plus I'm supposed to be working. Enjoy the crown before it starts to lose its lustre.

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  4. I'll bet you're the only one who interpreted the theme this way. Bon weekend, Eric.

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  5. Katie -- the crown lose its luster? oh no! But I guess if it could happen to Emma Bovary . . . (except I would never marry anyone as boring as Charles Bovary in the first place).

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  6. Alexa you might just need to do a quick polish to keep the crown shiny. ;-)

    Did anyone else think that Isabelle Huppert made a terrible Emma (back in the early 90s I believe)? I just remember being so bored by her performance that I wanted her to just die already and get me out of MY misery.

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  7. Love the take on 'passages.' Now I have another book to add to my 'to read before moving to Paris list.'

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  8. i like your choice Eric, pretty original!

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  9. Very original interpretation of the theme! I'll have to pass on Madame Bovary, though. ;)

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  10. Clever clogs!
    And what a good choice of passage it is as well. I love that book and many many others from the same period.
    Really good choice and excellent photography!

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  11. I'd love to see Passage Verdeau (perhaps another day), but your choice was both witty and elegant, Eric. So imaginative!

    And oh so close, Katie!!

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  12. hehe great minds! I too posted literature passages.

    Mme Bovary ....sigh... I love French literature, studied it at uni. Love Baudelaire, and earlier, La Rochefoucaud... I want to read them all again!

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  14. And that's why you are a genius!
    Only you would have thought of that.
    That is great, makes me feel like reading it again.
    I like literature from this period too, it's all so dramatic. I also like Baudelaire and Balzac.

    Have you ever read Eça de Queiroz (a portuguese writer)? I love his book Primo Basílio (Le cousin Basilio), he's one of the greatest writers of all times actually.
    Here's what Wekepedia says about him:
    "Queiroz est parfois surnommé le Zola portugais; à vrai dire son œuvre semble plus inspirée par l'esprit et même le style de Flaubert, qu'il admirait beaucoup"

    Rose what about you? Do you like this author? Something tells me you do.

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  15. Leave it to "Le Roi" to trump us all with his passage of a different kind. Well done Eric! We bow.
    V

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  16. I believe how we interpet the theme each month belies a lot about about our personalities. Excellent lateral thinking as so glad you chose the harder option from a classic book.

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  17. She thought, sometimes, that, after all, this was the happiest time of her life--the honeymoon, as people called it. To taste the full sweetness of it, it would have been necessary doubtless to fly to those lands with sonorous names where the days after marriage are full of laziness most suave. In post chaises behind blue silken curtains to ride slowly up steep road, listening to the song of the postilion re-echoed by the mountains, along with the bells of goats and the muffled sound of a waterfall; at sunset on the shores of gulfs to breathe in the perfume of lemon trees; then in the evening on the villa-terraces above, hand in hand to look at the stars, making plans for the future. It seemed to her that certain places on earth must bring happiness, as a plant peculiar to the soil, and that cannot thrive elsewhere. ~ Excerpt Madame Bovary {One of my favorite novels ~ Z}

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  18. Madame Bovary is on of my favourites too, and Therese Raquin.

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  19. What an unusual take on the theme! I like it.

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  20. It's not as pretty as the prose in Madame Bovary, but here's my favorite quote from Flaubert:
    “Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” It's on my bulletin board.

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  21. A most clever way to present "paths and passages" Sir! Anon- -"hand in hand to look at the stars, making plans for the future...[the]certain places on earth [that]must bring happiness, as a plant peculiar to the soil, and that cannot thrive elsewhere." oui kotn

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  22. Yes, certainly not mundane; good take on the word.

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  23. Great choice, Eric, as usual! (I finally figured out how to comment on your page!) California Nancee

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  24. On one of the rare months I played it straight, too! Given the number and quality of parisian passages, I was expecting one, too.

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  25. Very original, Eric. I love the way you keep us on our toes with your originality. I also adored Mme. B.

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  26. Happy Theme Day Eric!

    Maybe I should search for an English translation of it and read.

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  27. So clever and so French! Very fun take on this theme, Eric.
    -Kim
    Seattle Daily Photo

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  28. When I opened my Blogger page this morning, I found Eric's and Lynn's pictures, and I thought: "wow, these 2 friends really think alike" ;-))
    Nice interpretation of the Theme...

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  29. Thanks, Thib! That's a real compliment.

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  30. On a previous subject: demonstrations, I think perhaps the reserved English have had enough! We are turning into the French I think. Many demonstrations in the UK at the moment, one today about the Chinese Premier visit (re: Tibet) and in many areas, protests about the financial situation like the French but that there are so many English unemployed but the jobs are given to foreign workers. It's quite violent, the feeling.
    Prime Minister Brown, though, holds onto his Britishness by telling the demonstrators today "It's not the thing to do." LOL, I roll my eyes. It's about time we spoke out against our government I feel and, yes, in the streets, like the French. Peacefully, I must add.

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  31. Well aren't you the clever one! I love this!

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  32. 19th century French literature is wonderful! My French isn't good enough to read them in the original language, but before I die I hope to get through all of Balzac and Zola. Oh, and Hugo. Oops, forgot about de Maupassant. And Daudet. I'd better leave now, and go pick up a book.

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  33. Eric is once again off the beaten paths!
    That's why I like your blog.

    Mme Bovary...One of the books we have to read at school, compulsory reading, a wonderful discovery anyway. The 19th century literature in France is incredibly original and rich.

    One question though, how did you get this black background?

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  34. Oh yes love this text. Clever way to interpret theme day

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  35. Monica
    I do like Eça de Queiroz. Primo Basilio has been translated to many languages and it is a wonderful book...

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  36. Never read the book, but saw part of the version with Jennifer Jones. Katie: talk about misery!

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  37. My husband told me this one:

    "Flaubert is reported as telling the tale of a man taken fishing by an
    atheist friend. The atheist casts the net and draws up a stone on
    which is carved:

    'I do not exist. Signed: God.'

    And the atheist exclaims: 'What did I tell you!'"

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  38. I still wince every time I think about Hippolyte's grangrenous leg.

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  39. Nice theme choice, Eric! Oh, I wish I could read French. Someday!

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