Sunday, November 26, 2006

American Hospital of Paris


In France, the health system is considered to be good, not only because in 2000 the World health organization said it was the best one in the world, but also because everyone - rich or poor - has access to it. People who want a better service, however, prefer to go to private hospitals, like The American Hospital of Paris which was founded in 1906. It was originally established to offer American expatriates access to care provided by physicians trained in the United States. During WWII, the AHP became a military hospital under the Red Cross and was also awarded the Ordre de l'Armée and Croix de Guerre for services rendered to tens of thousands of Allied and French wounded.

57 comments:

  1. I would be so happy if our government put Health instead of War on the top of their priority list. Hillary Clinton worked very hard for several years to improve our health care system but she fought against the AMA (the strongest union in the USA), the pharmaceutical companies, and the lobbyists....tant pis! I liked the photo.

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  2. Michael....Love that Ms. Dewey thingey. Hilarious!

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  3. It's good to learn about Eric. I have long since known that the French health system is superior to ours in the Uk. We have lots of problems here, mainly with funding. Though, our Government finds it easy to send £miliions to other countries to help them. Now, before i get a flood of complaints about that, i want to help others too of course, but not when our health system is failing so badly at home! Anyway i digress into problems of the UK - don't get me started!
    So, i am interested in percentages here of patients at the AHP. How many are American using it now and what proportion of French, would you say, are able financially to use this hospital? I imagine, like our private system, it must be quite costly. Though, as you say, your public health system is excellent in any case. I am sure they are doing a very good job there at the AHP and it's so good to learn a little history as usual, Eric. Nice perspective on the pic too!

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  4. Be careful when looking at these kind of ratings. They can be very misleading. The criteria used explain why there are 3rd worold countries ranking HIGHER than first world countries in the overall category. Really, if you are still you (the person you are now), which place do you think you would get the best care?

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  5. And I know I'm going to get crap from someone out there for saying that. Still, I know a little about how ratings like this work and why there are so many third world countries higher than many first world. When the reality is, if you have a serious illness, those third world countries are not where you want to be. For example, let's say a third world country gives the most down and out free wellness check ups, that makes their number go up, but regarding care for life-threatening illnesses, they don't use the latest technologies or have the most educated physicians regarding cutting-edge discoveries.

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  6. Looks a fair bit nicer than any of the hospitals around here!

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  7. French healthcare system is quite famous around the world. In Chile its quality is well known and many physicians prefer to go to France to continue their studies.

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  8. Michael: yeah i write all those poems myself. do you really think they are good?

    Eric: i didn't know that france had the best health system in the world. there is one thing i love about france, its all the trees, grass and flowers the city incorporates in itself. spring break can't come fast enough!!!

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  9. Michael: yeah i write all those poems myself. do you really think they are good?

    Eric: i didn't know that france had the best health system in the world. there is one thing i love about france, its all the trees, grass and flowers the city incorporates in itself. spring break can't come fast enough!!!

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  10. Eric, thank you for the photo and history - interseting as always!

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  11. Susan, in Swimming Pool, after a couple of viewings, I'm inclined to think she made it all up. On the other hand, maybe she made up the young girl at the end. It was so clever - kind of like a French Rashomon. Or is it an English Rashomon? See, a hall of mirrors wherever you look.

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  12. I'm very grateful that someone else can do health care because I could never stomach it myself. I wish all in my country had such access to good health care.

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  13. This is in Neuilly right?? I had friends that lived on the Ile de la Jatte...I enjoyed the area, though it was quite far from everything.

    Aristotle Onassis[remember him??]died there..as did many other people I'm sure!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristotle_Onassis

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  14. Michael, I love Ms Dewey! Ask her how to take great photographs or how to write a great story...great responses.

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  15. Eric, I was surprised by the rating you listed, but do know that the French healthcare system is quite good. The question is how does one rate "good"? Service, mortality rate, technology, cleanliness, etc... all can be factors.

    The AHP has a reputation to be very expensive (by French standards), but many people do go there from all over the world, not just Americans.

    Yes Than, I found your poems very insightful and hope you keep up your writing. I imagine there aren't many 16 year old basketball players writing poems, which makes them even more interesting. Good job!

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  16. This was very interesting Eric. I think I've heard of an American Hospital in places like Egypt and elsewhere - is there something behind that like the American universities that are all over the world?

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  17. What were you doing at the hospital Eric? Is everything ok? If my eyesite is correct the sign on the grass says something like keep off. I guess you did?

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  18. Deborah, I found the following American hospitals elsewhere in the world. I didn't look too extensively, but here's a quick search result:

    => American Hospital located in Dubai

    => Anglo American Hospital, Zohoreya, Egypt

    => American University Beirut Medical Center located in Beirut

    => American Hospital, Estepona, Spain

    => American Hospital located in Rome

    => American British Cowdray Hospital located in Mexico City, Mexico

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  19. Wow Michael, that was quick. I'm off to bed now, hoping that I never need to use any of those hospitals!

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  20. Sorry...I should have said thank you. MERCI!

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  21. Wonder if Eric will be honest about keeping off the grass? He's an intrepid, scooter-riding photographer, don't forget! What about that scooter by the way Eric - where's a photo? We want you to set up a great shot as you always do, then get someone to press the button. Don't do time lapse thing where you're captured quizzically wondering why the shutter hasn't gone off yet, we want you composed, Bond-like on your get-around-town wheels! Nah, no pressure, just as you come will be great, just show us the scooter! ... please.

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  22. Lynn, maybe Eric fell off of his scooter and had to take it to the hospital?

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  23. Great timing! I was just in the American Hospital, accompanied by a French friend. He kept telling me how amazed he was at how clean everything place is. Plus you get treated right away (a priviledge you pay for...) Still, if you're an American and it's an emergency, it's nice to be surrounded by familiarity, and the care is excellent. I was in the emergency room for 3+ hours and my bill was about 520 euros for doctor fees and tests, fyi.

    The French medical system is inded quite good; I've always had good care from doctors here and unlike in the states, it's available to all regardless of income (although you do need to pay into the system, and many people buy supplimental insurance to cover the co-payment). The biggest difference, I find, is that doctors here lack a certain 'bedside manner' and can be quite 'to-the-point' which is disconcerting. Although they always seem to spend the time to make sure everything is covered and are very thorough. (and you always seem to leave with about 5 prescriptions, no matter how insignificant your problem is.)

    It's a shame that the US system has become complex and pricey, to the point where your care is controlled by the insurance companies rather than the doctors themselves. I don't know why Americans are so reluctant to change the system...especially since 47 million people don't have health insurance.

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  24. very nice view of the hospital.and talking about the health system....I dont know what should say. here we are in China, a very different country from west, even many kinds of systems.Early this year the government admitted that the health system reform in China in the past few years was failed. Now, for us, the normal people in China feel that the price of seeing doctors is much higher than before. So,we often joke with each other: be healthy,otherwise we dont have enouth penny to see the doctors.
    anyway, big wish for our government!

    jing
    www.shanghaidailyphoto.com

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  25. David. prescriptions: that's great if you get the medicine you need. Seems to me here in the UK you leave on the first visit having been told it's a virus which won't respond to antibiotics. When it's still there a couple of weeks later, you go back and they concede to give the antibiotics. My theory is that they must have the directive; send people away until they're DESPERATELY ILL. Then treat them, but lie in the first instance that's it's viral. I know i'm cynical, but saying it won't respond but that it will in two weeks doesn't make sense. Sometimes i wonder what's keeping us all here in the UK, really. There's a lot of natural beauty in the geography of the country i suppose. What else can i say?

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  26. ...and family. Must be family.

    Michael: funny! Yes, i get your idea. He may have been battered and bruised by a fall, but he would take his beloved SCOOTER to the hospital. Like it. lol.

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  27. David it's interesting what your friend says about the AHP being clean. I guess it's what you're used to, but I find it clean, but not spotless, they hardly use gloves, and it is much hotter than hospitals in the U.S. where I thought they were kept cold to kill germs. I don't know what other hospitals in France are like to compare it to though.

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  28. Hey Eric! Before we made our way to that unchartered territory known as Paris...I checked out this hospital's website! Just wanted to know where it was in case an emergency arose! Good thing I didn't need to set foot in the door! LOL! ;-) Love how green the grass is!

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  29. "Pelouse Interdite", there's no such thing in Oz.
    Grass is for barbeques, kicking the footy, and smooching.
    I thought Paris was supposed to be a romantic city.
    How can you park your scooter on it, if you can't walk on it?
    Must be an American sign!
    Better ask Ms. Dewey.
    At least the sign wasn't in Japanese, even though the doctors there are so fluent.
    Thanks again Eric: how about a street name for those of us who love to look from Google Earth, svp?

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  30. M. Benaut: think i must be the only one upon whom Ms. Dewey's merits are lost! After the initial novelty - "oh look there's a funny cyber woman who appears to be talking to me, ok it's irrelevant to my question, and random but hey it's new" - i find her quite irritating if you're there to look things up. She even knocked on my screen to get my attention whilst i was busy reading! How rude!

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  31. LOL Lynn !

    M.Benault - The AHP is located at 63, boulevard Victor Hugo, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine

    I think you'll also find that there are signs in almost all Paris parks saying stay off the grass. A bit bizarre I must say.

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  32. Lynn, you are perfectly correct.
    She's definitely not British, unlike the couple at the Cheltenham markets who were smooching.
    Imagine what would happen on the pelouse!
    Bad luck about the bébé dans un landau, but she certainly has loving parents.

    If the Americal Hospital is the one on Boulevard Victor Hugo, I must have seen it: a beautiful, leafy area.

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  33. Thank you Michael, you are so quick.
    But why is the postcode not 70019?
    You once explained Arondissements and postale codes to someone who asked and I saw it today or yesterday.
    It could have been a comment about one of Eric's very first postings.

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  34. Yes Michael it is strange to see those plentiful signs to keep off the grass, i recall it well. You'd think it's because Paris wants to be clean and tidy. Paradoxically, I also remember the streets having a lot of dog poo on them - presumably because they are not allowed on the grass?

    M. Benaut - thanks for visiting my blog and noticing those things! The couple are sweet, are they not?

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  35. Well, I've been in two French hospitals visiting friends and didn't notice that they were cleaner, or dirtier, than the American hospital. And yes Michael, I was surprised when they drew blood at the American hospital; the woman didn't put on gloves. I even mentioned it, and everyone seemed surprised.
    She didn't make a mess, though...thank goodness!

    One problem in France in that they issue so many prescriptions (unlike the UK, I guess) that it's become a big financial burden to the system, since drugs are government subsidized, and very inexpensive. I've seen ads by the French gvt. asking people not to take so many pills! Merkel in Germany tried to pass something to give incentives to doctors that don't prescribe too many drugs, but the doctors demonstrated and it was never passed.

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  36. Eric could i put in another request for a pic of Diana's memorial please? This has little reference to your pic today, except that the princess spent much of her time visiting hospitals. She is much missed here in the UK and only today, some 10 years after her death almost, her sons Princes William and Harry, having been noticed for providing no memorial and very little talking of their mother, are planning a rock concert to honour her. Too little, too late, i say. Dare i say, shame on them; this embarrasses and saddens me. I know they have carried on some of her charities but have not recognised her worth as mother and veritable pioneer of raising awareness of some 'hot potato' charities. So, i thank Paris again for having the beautiful gold memorial and ... please can we see it again? Thanks! Erm.. rant over. lol.

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  37. Lynn, Indeed they are.

    I feel guilty commenting here, on Eric's blog, but yours provides no opportunity unless one is a bloggeur(e).
    In any case, permit me to wish you the very best of British luck with your Cheltenham Blog.
    Were you reading John Halifax or just slinking?
    At least you were not holding the book upside down!

    Are you implying that French dogs can read signs?

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  38. Mais bien sur! Les chiens de Paris sont intelligents ne sont-ils? lol
    As for you not being able to leave a comment, i've obviously made an error on the technical side - not my forte at all. ? Sorry and thanks for your kind wishes.

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  39. I'm reading John Halifax, of course! Description at my other blog www.ukdailyphoto.blogspot.com
    Goodness sorry about all this on your blog Eric!

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  40. M. Benaut: Fixed! Thanks for letting me know.

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  41. Lynn, until Eric gets around to meeting your photo request (he must have so many), I found one he already made of the Diana memorial here, way back in March 2005. In fact, if I counted correctly, it's Eric's 16th post and he only had 2 comments back then!! Hard to believe!

    M. Benaut asked, "But why is the postcode not 70019?" I really have no idea, but imagine it's because it's just on the technical border of Paris and the Seine. The river is just on the other side of the hospital.

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  42. Thanks Michael that's kind of you. Yes, i'm sure he must be inundated of course. Two comments? My goodness let's get over there fast, Agent M. Amazing story, isn't it, Eric's rise to success through his love of Paris and the gift of a camera.

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  43. hola Eric, nice blog
    I adore Paris and france, and your post and pictures are absolutely adorables, specialy the section daily photos blog

    exelente!

    Bettina from Argentina

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  44. Hiya People! Eric...I have a request...can you show something next that uses batteries? Did that get anyone's attention? LOL! I couldn't resist (milking an old joke!)...the chat on the last post got reeeeeeeeeally heavy didn't it? Thought I'd lighten up things a bit! I don't get out MUCH! LOL! ;)

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  45. I bet that hospital is scary at night!

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  46. Sadly, I could write a dissertation on the subject of Paris-area hospitals, having had the misfortune of staying in 3 of them – the American Hospital, the Georges Pompidou Hospital and the Hotel Dieu. To summarize – the Pompidou wins hands down (facilities and care), then the American (good doctors, average facilities, very expensive) and as for the Hotel Dieu, one word of caution: RUN! It is mostly for the homeless and derelicts. ‘Nuff said (I still have nightmares).

    Having said that, hope you won’t get a chance to prove me right/wrong ;-)))

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  47. I agree with Johnny and everybody. Michael Ms. Dewey is really great. Thank you.

    > Lynn. Our health system suffers from funding problems too, let me tell you! I don't think there are many Americans in this hospital anymore, mainly rich people from the middle east I would think.

    > Susan you're right, I think the French like to think they have the best system but like you say it all depends on the criteria you're looking at. Personally I would go to the public system. That is where most of the money is invested in France.

    Also I find it interesting to see that the quality of care is judged differently throughout the world. Here in France we value more the fact that everybody can access the health system regardless of their income, whereas in the US it seems to me that people pay more attention to the technology and the education of physicians. I don't know about Asia.

    > Edulabbe. I did not know that. Interesting.

    > Than. Well that was in 2000, maybe things have changed now...

    > Kpgallant. Yes it's in Neuilly, very close to Paris. I did not know about Aristote, but I am not surprised, many famous people must have died there.

    > Michael, I don't know which criteria they took exactly but I suspect these people are pretty reliable.

    > Rachel. Yes, not to worry (but thank you!) in fact I visited someone there, but nothing serious ;) And yes! I kept off the grass!

    > Lynn. Like I said I DID stay off the grass! You'll have a photo of my scooter - actually I took one already but I don't like it...

    > David. What a coincidence! Yes you're right in this kind of places you have that extra service - like good food for instance! - that the public service is unable to offer. Not to mention that extra attention that French people are not good at dispensing in general...

    > Jing. that is very interesting. I had not idea that the Chinese system was so different from one place to another within the same country. I would have imagined a very centralized system with almost free access to medication for everyone. So basically you're saying that it is like everywhere in the world: more and more expensive!

    > Ame. Yes at least they speak English there and they know how Americans expect. But the best is not to have to go to any hospital during your stay here!

    > M. Benaut. You're right I should insert the Google maps link but that's too much work for me... I am sure that if you type American hospital Paris, in Google maps you'll find it.

    > Anonymous. Yes you're right. We love pills! Doctors say that if they don't prescribe medicines to their patients they go to another doctor. So the government spends fortunes on communications campaign to teach us that sometimes one good pill is better that 10 useless ones...

    > Lynn OK. I did post it already you know but that was a very long time ago - maybe the 1st month I started this blog.

    > Bettina. Thank you!

    > Isabella. I'm pretty sure your analysis is pretty accurate. Pompidou is the most recent one so it must still be clean and modern. Hotel Dieu must be one of the oldest ones.

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  48. Wow that was a lot of work for you Eric, addressing all those issues and i'm sure we all appreciate it. What an interesting post that turned out to be, bringing forth much debate. This is why your blog is so successful, you provoke thought.

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  49. provoke thought....stirs up trouble....po ta toe/po tah toe! LOL

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  50. Igor - you were born there? But it just opened in 1906! How can that be? LOL

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  51. Igor, we would all love you to read your telegramme from the Queen, (Her Most Gracious Majesty, Elizabeth II).

    There was a young man, very poor
    At concealing his age at Her door,
    But the Queen raised her sword
    And with such gentle word
    Said, "prithee do rise, Sir Igor".

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  52. I'm finally getting a trip to Paris in two weeks. Your blog has me so psyched up about it! :)
    Matt

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  53. I think I can see the very same room where I was born. But that's not me waving. Merci Eric! Not nearly enough pictures of this lovely institution with a truly remarkable history. We forget and that's our biggest mistake.

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  54. I am happy to find this very useful for me, as it contains lot of information. I always prefer to read the quality content.

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