Sunday, November 05, 2006

Daddy’s beard (Barbe à papa)


OK, it's not a good photo but it brings back the child in me! In France we call this type of sweet barbe à papa (daddy’s beard), because of how big and fluffy it is. This one was being whipped up near Bercy and children were eagerly waiting to get their hands on it! What do you call it in your country? Have a nice Sunday, I am off to Normandy for the day, a town they call the 21st arrondissement of Paris because a lot of Parisians go there for the week-end...

Update: Merci for all of your comments. Here's what you said you call barbe à papa in your part of the world:
Australia: Fairy floss, Canada: Cotton candy, Chile: Algodón de azúcar, Estonia: Suhkruvatt (sugar cotton), France: Barbe à papa (daddy's beard), Greece: Grandma's Hair, Hungary: Vattacukor (cotton-wool sugar), Indonesia: Gulali (from "sugar"), Italy: Zucchero filato, Japan: Watakashi, Norway: Sugar Spin, Peru: Algodón dulce (sweet cotton), Singapore: Candy floss, South Afrikaans: Spook asem (ghost breath), UK: Candy floss, USA: Cotton candy, Sweden: sockervadd, Poland: wata cukrowa (sugar coton).

66 comments:

  1. Wahou! Quelle barbe à papa !(il fallait bien que ce soit rentable pour 2€...). Le petit a dû être content...mais ne s'agirait-il pas de vous, Eric? En tout cas, ces peluches pleines de sucre me rendent nostalgique.

    ReplyDelete
  2. In the USA we call it cotton candy.

    ReplyDelete
  3. In Greece we call it "Grandma's Hair".
    But I think that everywhere in the world these images bring forward strong memories from the childhood.

    ReplyDelete
  4. No it was not me, I cannot eat sugar!

    I knew about cotton candy but not about Grandma's hair. Both names are really good.

    ReplyDelete
  5. In Chile, we call it "algodón de azúcar", which is similar to the US' cotton candy.

    I really love any kind of sweets and sometimes I leave the child in me resurface and I buy an algodón de azúcar (I try not to do it in very crowded places though, LOL)...

    ReplyDelete
  6. That's funny, "daddy's beard" and "grandma's hair"...I sure would hate to see dad and grandma in the same room together!

    I think it's a good photo. Where else but in France would you see a Perrier vending machine next to the cotton candy lady/man?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like the "beard" imagery. In Japanese this childhood treat is called 綿菓子 (watakashi)。This basically means "cotton candy."

    ReplyDelete
  8. Now, THAT's a classic! Brings back the kid in me, too. :-)

    On this picture, this Barbe looks absolutely massive! Ought to make some kid (?) really happy!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've seen it all now with this spam comment above! Hoodia Diet Pills? Come on now... how ridiculous is that? They must be expensive if you need a loan to buy them!

    ReplyDelete
  10. And in the US, they are unfortunately mostly pre-packed and sold at games (hockey...). Fairs and festivals often have a cotton candy booth. However, there's nothing like French candy here. Would you have any photos of Oursons au Chocolat?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Salut Eric!
    Je suis curieux: quelle ville en Normadie est considerée comme le «21ième arrondissement» de Paris? Et est-ce que le temps commence à faire froid chez vous? C'est certainement le cas ici (à Boston).

    Greg

    ReplyDelete
  12. I didn't like cotton candy as a kid, too sweet and sticky. But its a cool photo and I like the names barbe a papa and grandmas hair more than just plain cotton candy.

    How many hours drive is Normandy from Paris? Or do people take the train? Je suis curieuse :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. la barbe a papa, cela me fait penser a la foire au trone.
    Bon weeck end en normandie.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It is called Cotton Candy in Canada too. *s* Thanks for the wonderful picture!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Here it is sometimes known as "fairy floss" (at least it was when I was a boy and looked forward to the country fairs where it was sold along with other delicacies such a toffee apples and battered hot dogs). It’s a name I rather like because of the way it conjures up a fantasy world where this exotic candy is spun by the same elusive creatures who put money under the pillows of children in exchange for their discarded baby teeth. Whoever invented the stuff was wise (in a very wicked way, of course) to have made it pink - a colour that hardly brings to mind the aching, blackened cavities and shrill whine of the dentist's drill (well, not in the minds of sugar-loving children).

    Hope you had a great weekend, Eric.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Just a quick answer on the "21st arrondissement de Paris" (I'm late!)

    Deauville is often called the 21st arrondissement of Paris becasue during week-ends it's full of Parisians. Deauville is a fancy little town - a bit snoby... - 2 hours away from Paris. You can go there by train (2 hours) or by car.

    Next to Deauville, across one bridge there is also Trouville a less glamourous city than Deauville and more family oriented. That is where I am going to see my 93 year old beloved aunt. I do not resist to show you 2 pictures: one with here husband in the 30's and one nowadays.

    She's done everything in her life, including car racing!

    ReplyDelete
  17. In South Africa we also call this Candy Floss. I'm Afrikaans so we say "Spook asem" (means ghost breath). I've never seen such a big on before in my life! I'd be scared of tooth decay after such a sweet treat!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Yeah, it's Candy Floss in the UK too.

    ReplyDelete
  19. "Deauville is often called the 21st arrondissement of Paris"

    I thought Deauville belonged to the 16th arrondissement ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Bonne journée en Normandie. En Basse Normandie, le temps est très clément. Grosses bises à tes proches :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. Deauville is Lexington's "sister city". A gentleman from there owns a posh French restaurant in our city called "Le Bistot". Food isn't bad but over priced. Can you imagine the waiters dressed as the classic French waiter but with a heavy Kentucky accent? We are famous for race horse raising as is Deauville. Cotton candy always intrigued me but it is yucky and too sweet.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Ha! That brings back memories for me as well!

    We call it "cotton candy" in the southeast U.S. They may call it the same in other parts of America but I can't be certain. I guess it is a universal children's sweet.

    ReplyDelete
  23. While looking for the ingredients to make cotton candy, it seems way to complicated to make at home. However, I found one type of cotton candy that I am sure SUSAN will love.

    Pink Cotton Candy cocktail recipe

    4 oz vodka
    4 oz amaretto almond liqueur
    pink lemonade

    Pour all ingredients over ice in a collins glass, stir, and serve. Serves 4!

    ReplyDelete
  24. That sounds yummy Michael.

    Here's another recipe that's not too serious. I'll only tell you that the ingredients include:

    - Plastic swimming pool
    - 50 pounds sugar
    - 20 gallons water
    - Dad's boat and motor
    - Dad's truck with trailer hitch
    - Gelatin (any flavor)

    ReplyDelete
  25. The candy is too sweet! I recently bought some for my son and couldn't resist tasting it just to feel it melt on my tongue even though it is sickingly sweet! It certainly does make you feel like a child again.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Oh Eric, what a blast from the past! First I go over to the blog from the guy from the Ozarks who commented yesterday (I have a lot of familyin the Ozarks, as I was born down that way), and now cotton candy!

    We still have hand spun cotton candy at the one carnival a year I never miss, the one my hometown throws Memorial Day weekend. I hope that never changes, because the prepackaged stuff just isn;t the same.

    Michael, good thing I need to go shopping today anyway, because that recipe looks yum-tastic! I'm totally trying it today. I'll have to share with you guys a drink my brother invented last New Year's that was just do die for. And my hhusband's getting some ingredients for a drink he came up with and he's gonna mix some up tonight. If thats good I may just share. No, we aren't big drinkrs around here at all!

    Oh yeah, one more thing. Eric, your aunt looks like a fun and wonderful woman! She's definately got the face of someone whos never passed up a challenge! Beautiful person, both 60 years ago and today!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sounds like you're going to make your own carnival at your house soosha_q. Hope you don't get sick from the ride ! ;-)

    Metaphysicalmama, the link to the recipe you posted is hilarious! I wonder if any kids actually try it out. Don't let soosh_q know, she's likely to take the truck out for a spin tonight after her cocktail spree!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Eric, cotton candy is forever associated with the one time I went to the circus as a child. I can still feel and taste the sugar dissolving on my tongue.

    Thank you for sharing the photos of your very lovely aunt. She looks so young. I see the family smile! Bon voyage.

    ReplyDelete
  29. We called it "gulali" because it made from sugar (gula)

    ReplyDelete
  30. in Hungary we call it: cotton-wool sugar (vattacukor)

    ReplyDelete
  31. Looks like Grandpa's hair to me :)

    ReplyDelete
  32. It's not always pink... I know I've seen both blue and lilac!

    I'm not a fan, when it's fresh. However, put it in a plastic bag and let it sit until it becomes a hardened, styrofoam-like thing? Yummy!

    (Gross, I know.)

    When I told the jeune parisiennes that we called it cotton candy (bonbon à coton), they thought that was pretty funny. But then, after thinking about the french name, they thought that was pretty funny, too!

    ReplyDelete
  33. In Singapore, it's "candy floss" too (some remnant, I suppose, of our British colonial heritage?). But sometimes it's also "cotton candy". :-)

    ReplyDelete
  34. I just read that candy makers William Morrison and John C. Wharton created a machine to make cotton candy in 1897, and that cotton candy made one of its first world debuts in 1900 at the Paris Exposition and then again in 1904 at the St. Louis World Fair.

    Whouldathought?

    ReplyDelete
  35. In Italy we call it: "zucchero filato"..I love it

    ReplyDelete
  36. Wonderful name! French are so creative - i wonder if it is so cause they drink lots of wine;) In estonian it is "suhkruvatt" which translates "sugar cotton" in english.

    ReplyDelete
  37. In Canada it's cotton candy or candy floss. I never liked it because it was too sticky. When I went to the fair, I always loved the smell of it.

    ReplyDelete
  38. We were just there two days ago! I loved the name of "cotton candy"! Use to be one of my favorite things to eat as a kid ..... actually, it even is as a kid!

    ReplyDelete
  39. oops, jetlag! actually, it is still one of my favorite things to eat as an adult!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Well I've never got "cotton candy" that big here in America. I'm jealous...I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Well...a day or two in Normandie sounds perfect to me, hope it isn't too damp!

    To "Michael"...Merci for the info on Pascal Beaudry! He was here in San Francisco at our Alliance Francaise when the book came out[in French]but I didn't know that it had been published in English. I will try to find it, perhaps on line. Perhaps you could run a Welcome-Drop In center for PDP fans when they are visiting in Paris..LOL!! I'll bet you would be very busy, with plenty of "bon mots" to share!! Merci encore!

    ReplyDelete
  42. kpgallant - Click here for a free download of the full english text of Baudry's book. It's great you got to hear him speak. I saw him in Paris and was obviously impressed.

    By the way kpgallant, do you have your own blog?

    ReplyDelete
  43. Eric, I showed my mom (93 yo also), the pictures of your aunt. She loves to look at pictures of older people. So sweet all of them like barbe å papa.

    ReplyDelete
  44. michael...No, I'm not on PDP all day, but I could be...with all the amazing archives. I'm at work and bored...so it's PDP. I don't have my own blog, but I do have a name for one..LOL!! I did enjoy Pascal Beaudry, he really has a "thing" for America which is interesting...I want to read the book in English though as my father was French and growing up in the US I was often in a quandry...asking "why can't I do that"?? LOL!! As an adult it is so interesting to read about things like this..it helps to understand my French/American upbringing!! I guess that is why I am so comfortable when I'm in Paris! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  45. In Norway we call it Sugar Spin. My daughter's have bought barbe à pap in France several times, and I love that name :-)

    ReplyDelete
  46. This photo brings back so many wonderful moments. We call it "candy floss".

    ReplyDelete
  47. In Australia it's called "fairy floss"

    ReplyDelete
  48. In my country that is called "algodón dulce" (sweet cotton). And it's sold in circus on holidays.

    Greetings from a peruvian in Barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  49. Michael,

    Are you implying that I'm a drunk? :o LOL!

    I will try it and let you know what I think. I used to love apple martinis before I "discovered" red wine about two years ago and now I almost exclusively drink Pinot Noir or Cabernet Sauvignon. Except we had a bottle of Shirah last night with dinner.

    Apple Martini:

    4 ounces Grey Goose Vodka (best vodka in the world)
    4 ounces Apple Pucker (apple liquour)
    Splash of Midori
    Garnish with a slice of golden and delicious apple (or any green apple)

    By the way, I went to see the Louvre exhibit here in Atlanta yesterday! It was fabulous! Made us miss paris (I went with a friend who has been to Paris several times as well and he loves it too)!

    ReplyDelete
  50. Oh oh I got a great idea! I'm gonna get a HUGE pool and multiply the recipe by like 100 and then we can all go swimming in cotton candy! Who's with me? Come on, it'll be the "sweetest" swin you've ever taken! And no, Michael, I haven't even started drinking yet! ...I swear...

    ReplyDelete
  51. In portugal it's "Algodão Doce". It translates to sweet coton too.

    ReplyDelete
  52. It is also interesting to note that cotton candy in the US is almost invariably that same hot pink color that shows in barbe a papa. Is that true elsewhere?

    ReplyDelete
  53. You got it all wrong eric. In the U.K. we call this sort of thing a French poodle! hee hee

    ReplyDelete
  54. takes me back to my school days...i still love eating it with my son.... thanks for the nostalgic memorade... ....

    ReplyDelete
  55. In Turkey it's called "pamuk helva" (cotton halva).

    ReplyDelete
  56. not a good photo!?! it's perfectly hilarious!

    ReplyDelete
  57. god it looks so yummy! i could eat it all! daddy's beard is a much better name than candy floss! yumyum!

    ReplyDelete
  58. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  59. in Polish it's called "wata cukrowa" (something like "sugar cotton")

    ReplyDelete
  60. Great pic. I adore the stuff! Yummy. There's a different type of candy floss at my blog, a beautiful cloud which looked, to me, like nothing other than barbe a papa!

    ReplyDelete
  61. En Suède on dit "sockervadd".

    ReplyDelete
  62. In Russia we call it "сахарная вата" - "sugar cotton wool"

    ReplyDelete
  63. en nouvelle-zelande on dit "candy floss"
    YUM!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Nice post and comments...
    In Iran we call it "پشمك"(Pashmak/păshmăk/=woollen)
    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  65. how about OWENS CORNING FIBERGLASS!?!

    ReplyDelete
  66. In Korea, we call it 'somsatang'
    which means cotton(som) candy(satang) either. :)
    Also we had a cute character for children named 'barbe a papa' 6 or 7 years ago. don't know where the character from, though. Anyway, I think it's always so cute in everywhere and remind us our own childhood. feeling Happy :)

    ReplyDelete