Tuesday, June 17, 2008

12 hours for the Franco-Israeli relationships


In Paris, there are 2 main Jewish quarters: the "Pletzel", located in Le Marais and Le Faubourg-Montmartre where I took the photo of these clever posters, advertising for an upcoming event called Les 12 heures bleues (the 12 blue hours) - organized by the French Jewish Student Association. It will be the occasion to debate about the relationships between France and Israel, to listen to Israeli music, watch Israeli films... Talking about Israel, let me encourage you to visit this site and scroll down a little. I'm sure, you'll recognize the guy in the photo ;) And if you can read Hebrew, the experience will probably be even better!

105 comments:

  1. Great idea, to open a dialogue like this. Wish I could read Hebrew.

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  2. I love the idea of Israel and France as a double dip! The photos of street art always transport me to a Paris that's up to the minute. This is no exception.

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  3. I think these sorts of exchanges are so valuable to promote understanding. I have to say I like the graphic in the poster.

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  4. Ooh -- Alexa -- we both logged at 12:21 am -- now what!!! :)

    Your speeding fingers carried the day -- congratulations!

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  5. Eric -- So what does the caption say with the picture in their site? My, you DO get around!

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  6. Carrie -- what do you say we call it a tie?

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  7. When I go to Paris I will be staying near the Jewish Quarter in the 4th and I hope there will be cool goings on then, too.

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  8. I will need to come back a bit later when I can take a closer look at all this. But no matter how hard I look, I don't think I will be able to make out the Hebrew text. So, Eric, would you like to give us the scoop on what that page means and how your lovely picture came to grace it ... or do we all get to guess? (And remember, you are dealing with a group of VERY creative imaginations here!!!) :)

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  9. I didn't know the one in the 4th was called the pretzel, though -- oh -- wait. No.

    So does anyone know what the Pletzel means or is? I love words.

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  10. I love your gray suit. Don't you look jaunty.

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  11. Parisian heart "Eric, would you like to give us the scoop on what that page means and how your lovely picture came to grace it..."

    You'll have to wait... (actually I don't know what it says, but I'll tell you the story behind it ;)

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  12. Carrie -- a pletzel is a kind of cracker, something you might find in a Jewish deli.
    BTW, you wrote one line more than I did in your first post, so . . .

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  13. All right!!! I almost feel like whistling again (did you see that suit?!!! YSL would be proud! Hey, Eric, you don't dress like THAT to go see your fan base in San Francisco or even at the PDP picnic in France! Ha!)


    Really, nice suit!! ;)

    Oh, and I recognized the words "parisdailyphoto" in there.

    Seriously, I hope the relationship between France and Israel is good. I remember when I was a kid in Paris, it wasn't unusual to hear that a bomb had exploded at such and such synagogue (temple). But then again, it's highly doubtful that these were the acts of French people. I would imagine most likely these were terrorist acts of people "neighboring countries" of Israel, just trying to send a message.

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  14. Funny title for the event : les 12 heures bleues... Not one more, not one less!
    Congratulations for the photo (je t'ai reconnu!!! hehe) but the caption is hebrew for me ;)
    zzzz

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  15. I meant "I would imagine most likely these were terrorist acts of people FROM "neighboring countries" of Israel, just trying to send a message.

    But of course, what do I know.

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  16. Alexa -- you're too funny -- last thing we need is more rules. We'll have people going for 35 two word sentences.

    I'd rather lie in wait for next time. Thanks for the generosity tho -- its what makes PDP so lovely. (I should know, but don't, if I just committed an apostrophy horror with my 'its'. Now that's something knowing the rules on (dangling participle!)).

    :D

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  17. Je n'ai compris qu'une seule chose sur la page web: ParisDailyPhoto!! LOL
    These 12 blue hours are a great idea. But this advertising is quite...unusual? We are all ice creams... :p

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  18. LOL Tomate! (Untrue actually, this is the suit I was wearing when I went to see Lois in SF! Et toc !)

    Thank God it's been a long while since we've had Synagog attacks.

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  19. Alexa - do you know why the area is called the Pletzel? A cracker name is a funny sort of moniker for a neighborhood.

    And, Eric, I concur in the fashionista opinions - you look mahvelous.

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  20. I quite agree, Eric, you look quite sharp in your suit!

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  21. Really? Lois, you got the suit?!! Tsk, tsk, tsk...

    ;)

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  22. Eric, you look so handsome - I wish I could read the Hebrew... Could someone please translate?

    Those double cones remind me of going to Berthillon... yummy!

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  23. Carrie -- it sort of evolved into another name for a deli, I think (please, some enlightened French person correct me if I'm wrong -- a distinct possibility always). Don't know who out there remembers Jo Goldenberg's deli on the rue des Rosiers, in the heart of the Marais. On the awning, it said " Jo Goldenberg - Pletzel" if I remember correctly. I was there at least once a week back when, and aghast when I read in 1982 that someone had tossed a grenade into the place, then opened fire with a machine gun. Fairly early on in the whole "terror timeline."

    On a MUCH lighter note, I appreciated what you said about Fury, my wonderful, spirited black horse, er, blue bike. And I agree, kids are a total trip! Glad you had a nice vacation, bruises notwithstanding.

    Guille -- thanks for putting up all the Bac philosophy questions (Corinne aussi). Had an interesting time discussing them with one of my daughters, who wants to know how the responses are graded.

    And, Eric -- truly YSL would have been proud.

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  24. Hi Pont Girl -- check your Kir Royale, ok? :) Carrie

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  25. Good...handsome...what? You look downright SEXY! Oh la la Eric.

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  26. Guille, apparemment, j'ai fait plus de progres en hebreu que je ne connaissais ... Moi, j'ai compris deux choses sur le page web: et ParisDailyPhoto ET Eric Tenin! :D

    Okay Eric, I shall anxiously await the recounting of your latest adventure.

    I'm off for an appointment, but I shall return!

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  27. ohhh my laptop crashed so i missed GF! I'm so sick of it crashing; enOUGH already.

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  28. Oh my goodness i would love to go to this event. I really would. Eric you look amaaaaazing in the photo. Gorgeous suit. You look really sharp. Ok, finalement, i admit it. J'suis en amour......;) mmmm that suit.....mmmm

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  29. Alexa - I went to Jo Goldenberg's 3 years ago for lunch. Pretty yummy - they had the hugest matzo balls I have ever seen (delish) and some beans that were the size of my thumbs (aussi delish).

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  30. Hi Carrie!! I was wondering which one was you! You have to tell everyone here about our geographical proximity - hee, hee. I also just e-mailed you.

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  31. he he Pont Girl, can't believe you said delish. I say that all the time! lol.

    Eric have i told you that you look wonderful tonight?

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  32. I suspect this poster has a greater impact on those of us who lick our flavours all at once - as opposed to those of us who prefer to lick them one at a time. In the interests of global harmony, the latter need to urgently reconsider their preference.

    And, no, I'm not talking about ice-cream.

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  33. LOL Lucio! I don't even want to think about what you mean.

    Alors, maintenant j'suis fatigue. Comme Eric dit assez souvent, je fais dodo. Bonne nuit x

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  34. Very awesome graphic art! I've been to Israel, but it was a very long time ago--almost 20 years!! Oh my word! I can't believe it has been that long! Beautiful country and ancient places, lovely to see.

    PS:
    Eric, how dashing you look!! Definitely a good advertisement for the PDP; can't wait to hear the rest of the story!

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  35. Politics, Lynn - politics. Not the other thing. For now, that's your domain! (lol)

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  36. It's agreed: Eric will wear his gray suit to the next PDP picnic.

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  37. What a handsome photo of Eric. I think I will print it out and frame it. People will think he is my boyfriend ;-)

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  38. I love it when a man works a suit, and it obeys.

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  39. I was just asked to confirm if that was the suit Eric wore when he came to visit me. Yes, that is the suit Eric wore. For those of you who do not know -- Eric is tall.

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  40. Eric...when I first looked my mind was still on Bollywood films from yesterday, and I thought we were looking at a movie poster of some new film. Next I thought it was some new ad for "Berthillon" and then I realized how off I was on both accounts. The posters do catch one's attention, but I must admit if they were going for the "Ebony-and-Ivory"-living-in- perfect-harmony feel I must admit it's a stretch. I will say that you are indeed a handsome gent in the suit, but I suppose we knew that already. Thanks for keeping us in tune to the latest in Paris. You've always the camera on the pulse of the city.

    Lucio...We do live in a world with more than a few one-at-a-time lickers out there, eh? Hope it does change and maybe this 12 hour blues will keep the ball rolling. I wonder if there will be any 12 bar blues? Now that might sell it for me...that and the ice cream of course. :-)

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  41. Eric you look fabulous. I believe you are the perfect man to be representing Paris.
    All this intrigue is quite wonderful. I wish I could read Hebrew and French. I would love to know what is going on in your link- as well as what Lynn is writing!

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  42. uselaine: 'I love it when a man works a suit, and it obeys.'

    Your witticism caught my attention: but, if I may, I'd like to suggest a minor alteration which, I think, would make it even better - perfect, in fact.

    'I love it when a man commands a suit, and it obeys.'

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  43. Lucio and Uselaine...way to work together on that one. Love it. High fives to both of you! Now if only I could get my composition students to write like that...

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  44. I don't know, I think Eric's workin' the suit.

    Eric, can't wait to hear the story. Maybe your photo's on the site just because you look so damned good.

    But maybe your photo's on the site because PDP brings together people from all walks of life--people of differing opinions, religions, races and backgrounds from all over the world--into one happy place where we get along pretty darned well.

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  45. A well trained suit falls in line. No command necessary. Just a look. Perhaps a gesture. Teamwork. Savoir faire. Je ne sais quoi.

    I used to have a...team...like that. Now I only have the suit.

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  46. Jeff: "A well trained suit falls in line. No command necessary. Just a look. Perhaps a gesture. Teamwork. Savoir faire. Je ne sais quoi."

    I would add: pfft.

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  47. I could find some Ynet English pages but even in the travel pages I couldn't find direct reference to Eric. Anyone else?

    The article about the Israeli woman in New Zealand who stripped naked at an ATM in retaliation for some construction worker's wolf whistles was "eye catching."

    Some France and Paris related material as well.

    It seems that Eric might "suit" any number of his fans here but from the Ynet photo he showed us one can infer that he prefers to go it with no "ties."

    (Let me be the first to groan).

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  48. Eric, Very interesting -- and looking forward to more info about what you are involved with for this event. The PDP ambassador.

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  49. Command has several meanings, guys, and "to order" is only one of them. It can also mean "to have authority over" - which, I suppose, is one way of saying that it's the man who makes the suit, and not the other way around: or, if you prefer, that it's the man who "works" it. In this case, "command" is better because of this double meaning ("working" only has one, really) and its connection with "obey"; which at first seems obvious, but, in the end, isn't.

    Anyway, that's my two cents for the day.

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  50. These posters are very well done;the colours and the composition.And the event sounds like great idea. And this photo is great because there's three posters in a row which makes a new composition again.

    I really like the Jewish quarters around Rue des Rosiers in Le Marais.

    And now on to todays real topic:Eric,looking good, in his nice grey suit.
    You DO look great Eric and I can only support what's already been said.
    You sure are everywhere.Can't wait to hear your story about how you ended up on a Hebrew site. Has it to do with this event ?

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  51. Thank you Eric for the interesting post and the story to follow.

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  52. lol sorry Lily. All i wrote was that i was tired and was finally going to bed, good night!

    Oh...and... the small fact that i'm in love with Eric. .... ?

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  53. Nice Suit Eric.

    Pletzel is Yiddish, diminutive for Platz (square). Bretzel is a cracker.

    Nice article on Ynet too. I'll try to give you a traduction later.

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  54. C'est vrai, quelle élégance, Mr Tenin. Le gris de ce costume se marie si bien au vert très doux de la porte...;-)

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  55. Greetings from Warsaw!
    ----
    http://warszawa78.blox.pl - my Warsaw photoblog

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  56. .... and a French shrug, surely, Petrea....;) lol

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  57. I think this suit is begging to be the new profile pic.

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  58. Pont Girl - aujourd'hui - avec la nouvelle photo - j'explique a tout le monde!

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  59. Esther - thanks for the Yiddish translation and looking forward to your offering of more.

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  60. Votre Reine Guillemette la Premiere has completed her exams. Congratulations, Guille!

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  61. Mais l'homme bien-habillé devrait-il avoir porté sa cravate tricolore ?

    It seems the ladies are awarding you first prize today Eric; well done !!

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  62. Vraiment, Jeff? Congratulations, Guille!

    Lynn, you're right! A new profile shot. Though I'd miss the old one.

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  63. Jeff...I guess for Guille that ranks right up there with getting GF for the PDPday. Guille...I echo Jeff's congratulations! [two thumbs up]

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  64. I know M. Benaut. Amazing what a simple, casual suit can do LOL!

    OK, so let me tell you about the story behind this article.

    A few months ago I received an email from Kinneret, an Israel journalist who said she wanted to write a column about PDP - and me...

    We met about 2 weeks ago, in the Bastille area (at first she thought I was American!). I told her everything bout PDP, how I started, Why I still spend hours doing it everyday, what kind of scenes I'm interested in...

    Then Kinneret said she wanted to take a photo of me so we went to a little concealed passage on the place de la Bastille and that is how she took this wonderful photo!

    Voilà...

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  65. And Guille, congratulations, of course.

    As much I would like to go back in time, I surely would not want to experience taking exams again...

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  66. I have to agree with all those who commented on Eric's picture - it is very sharp (impossible to convey the way we say that in Boston - something like "shahp") but I think we have to say the suit is nothing without the man inside - handsome, as always, Eric!

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  67. It's a lovely story, Eric. Did she write about you, too? It would be great to know what she said about you and PDP.

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  68. Wow, the way you are telling this story, Eric... Makes me feel so jealous... Not a bit, a lot... You told "her" "everything", why you "still spend hours doing it everyday", what kind of scenes "you're interested in"... Ouch If I could.
    Sure she is pretty, isn't she?

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  69. Oy, I am kvelling at how impressive you look , Eric! This is not Barbra Streisand kibbitzing, but PHX-CDG.
    J. Goldenberg in the Marais is gone, as of this year, sniff.It is all boarded up now and nothing is in its place.
    There is a picnic on the street that I saw advertised on a poster yesterday. It is this Thurs. at 7pm at the corners of rue Grenelle, rue de la Chaise and rue St. Guillaume. Mr. Phx doesn't know he is going yet--he's a hermit--, but I would love to see anyone who is in town again. It pays to look at posters around the city!

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  70. Thanks Petrea, Jeff, Coltrane, Eric! Yes, it's done. I'm free until September now!!!
    I plan to go out tonight to celebrate my freedom with some friends. So I won't be GF...

    "As much I would like to go back in time, I surely would not want to experience taking exams again..." Hehe Eric, you know what exams in Nanterre look like right?! I'm sure you miss this University, but not the exams, for sure! :)

    Bonne soirée à tout le monde. :D

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  71. Like Petrea, I have to say to you Lucio, he's workin' the suit. I'll bet Kinneret thought so too. ;^)

    It's an American idiom, perhaps over applied, said of people who authoritatively, robustly, even gleefully don a garment with attitude and moves that display it to best advantage. I meant to juxtapose that newer sense of the word "working" with its traditional sense, thereby using "obey" as a surprise result. In that contradiction, I wished to convey that while he works it (always meant to be a compliment on its face), he goes a step beyond those successful "fashion slaves" by instead transcending the well chosen suit. Thus, the man remains the proper focus. Effortlessly, if you get my drift.

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  72. Ah, merci Eric, for the lovely story. And Esther, if you get a chance to translate, I know we'll be delighted. If Eric looks even half as good in the story as he does in the suit, then once it gets around, he may need a bodyguard! Whatever the state of Franco-Israeli relations, I am sure they have been strengthened via PDP -- which brings everyone together! Seriously, Eric, when you started, you must never have imagined the community that would build up around your creative work!

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  73. Oh, and Felicitations, Guille! Amuse-toi bien ce soir!!

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  74. Guille congratulations ! Have a nice evening ;)

    Anonyme; you sounds a bit like our UK Lynnieeee....
    Could it be you (incognito) ????

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  75. Well, Eric...you do look sharp in the photo and I really like the setting as well. It makes Paris look so "summery", as you rest under the vines.

    By the way, aren't you about due for another San Francisco visit?? It is June after all...and tomate would really like to see that grey suit! ;-) We'll put in a request for sunshine! LOL!

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  76. Guille: Congratulations! This evening you might ponder the answer to the question, "Is it easier to have a good time in other bars or the one you are in?" And I hope that inebriative substances do not transform your consciousness of reality so that your perceptions are re-educated to the degree that your hair hurts the next morning (a la Jeff).

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  77. Bettina LOL ! No, I'm not Anonyme; Lynnie just comes right out and says it in her own name! Plus, i don't get jealous.. I know all the ladies love Eric!

    Petrea i would miss the first profile shot too. Maybe he could put that somewhere else on the site.

    Guille well done! Breathe easy now. I LOVE exams! I find them really quite exciting. Provided i'm prepared of course. I was so enthusiastic about mine, i took on far too many over 2 years including a teaching qualification and acting in plays and directing them, i just bit off more than i could chew and i could have got better results. Although Guille you too are doing a lot with two degrees - this is why you remind me of me - i think you are more focussed and concentrated on the two big ones instead of many smaller subjects. Am i rambling? LOL.....:)

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  78. Guille -- let me add my congrats to all the others. Hope you had a super time tonight!

    Oh, and like Lynn, I'm feeling very sleepy and think I'll go to bed. Oh wait -- it's 6pm here; no one will fall for that. In that case, I'm getting on the subway now. (Except I really am. GF will get no competition from me ce soir.)

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  79. LOL Alexa; 6 pm, no you'll have to think of something better than that. I had to pop out so i missed the GF race (yes, out this late at night. I know).

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  80. Wow Eric! You'll never convince me that that isn't the Hebrew edition of Men's Wear Daily with you in the feature article. Gray suits you well (groan. . .I'm starting to sound like Michael.) You certainly have a loyal admiration society in this comments section. Perhaps George Clooney and Brad Pitt will have to make room for your cover shot on People Magazine?!!!
    Guille, big congratulations. Enjoy your summer. Finishing one's studies allows life to be lived in the moment a day at a time instead of three days at a time: what I turned in yesterday, what must I study and accomplish today, what's due tomorrow and beyond?! Yikes. The pressure of exams. Enjoy yourself!
    -Kim

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  81. uselaine: I think we've both proven that to explain isn't always to convince.

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  82. Clever advertising on the posters! I am sure you will have a great time at this event. Please be sure to share with us anything interesting that you learn!

    I liked your photo on the other site...wish I could read Hebrew to see what it said!

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  83. Hi everyone !!
    I live in Israel since 2004 but I was born in Paris and lived there until my 26 years.
    Youe blog is just amazing and give me fresh parisian air each time I watch it.
    Thank you so much.
    I will try to translate you as soon as I can the hebrew article and will post here the translation.
    See you !

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  84. Ooh Stephanie - thank you.
    Eric: I simply have to concur with all of the other ladies. You look absolutely gorgeous in that suit but it's not just the suit, it's the pose. I think you should be on the big silver screen myself. xx

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  85. Thanks Stephanie.

    As for me, I don't mind if you don't translate every word accurately. I think we are interested in getting some idea about what was written about Eric and PDP. Just the gist (essentiel?) is fine.

    That is so kind of you to offer to do that.

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  86. Mme Benaut "I think you should be on the big silver screen myself."

    Blush! LOL ;)

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  87. Thank you, Stephanie! How generous of you.

    Tall Gary, I agree, a sense of the article would make me happy. I don't know if others feel the same way.

    And I also agree with Mme Benaut. (I'm so agreeable today!) I think that's why we were saying he was working the suit. That debonair pose, that air of chic--it's not the suit, it's Eric!

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  88. Hmmm....do you think it was meant to look like a giant phallic ice cream cone?

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  89. Hi Eric,

    I translated the article in French. I suppose you'll find lots of peaple to translate it further to English.

    Esther

    Here it goes:

    Blogs dans la ville des lumières

    Les ordinateurs portables et les blogs ont remplace le carnet noir chez les graphomanes français.

    Tenir un journal est apparemment un passe-temps ancien chez les français, au moins autant que la pétanque. Dans le métro, dans les cafés, aux barrières des lycées, il est toujours possible de voir un grand nombre de personnes, des femmes pour la plupart, qui écrivent avec un tout petit stylo sur de petits carnets reliés de noir, tels ceux d'Hemingways.
    Trois babysitters, différentes les unes des autres, tant par la nationalité que par la langue maternelle, ont refermé violemment leurs carnets pour l'enfouir au plus profond de leur sac, au premier son de notre entrée dans l'appartement. Qu'y avaient-elles écrit, je meurs d'envie de le savoir : la prochaine grande pièce de théâtre ? Leurs idées pour un sketch ? La description du contenu de leur appartement pour se défendre en cas d'éviction ?
    Mes recherches, et j'ai fait mon service militaire en Israël n'ont eu aucun résultat. Toutes les trois ont fermé hermétiquement leur bouche et n'ont consenti qu'à avouer écrire toutes sortes de choses pour elles-mêmes. Mais je comprends certainement comment la vie dans une grande métropole, et à Paris en particulier peut conduire quelqu'un à se réfugier non seulement dans l'écoute des MP3à l'aide d'écouteurs minuscules, mais même dans l'écriture dans un carnet noir ou dans un ordinateur portable guère plus grand, dans mon cas.
    . . .

    Trois heures par jour sur un blog

    Eric Tenin, journaliste parisien de naissance et bloggueur ces dernières années, a pris quelques minutes de réfléxion pour réfléchir ce qu'il aime tant que çà dans cette ville. "Les rives de la Seine," dit-il "et peu m'importe qu'elles soient complètement touristiques, et Monmartre aussi. Mais surtout, surtout" avoue-t-il après quelques minutes d'observation concentrée sur les passants place de la Bastille, ce qu'il aime le plus à Paris, "c'est ma possibilité d'y être anonyme, d'être ce que l'on veut où qu'on le veuille." Et il consacre plus de trois heures par jour à développer son blog et à renforcer le lien avec ses lecteurs, en France et dans le monde.

    De nombreux blogs décrivent la vie à Paris. Le café et les croissants, et à vrai dire, bien après que ce soit fini, je m'attarde encore sur les aventures des habitantes de la ville pendant les soldes et à l'ouverture des boutiques à fréquenter, après tout une veste en jeans est une veste en jeans, en n'importe quelle langue. Puis je parcours les expériences des étrangers dans Paris ; eux aussi, tout comme moi, s'écrasent à répétition aux hautes murailles élevées par les standardistes des centres d'aide. Et j'ai même mon étrangère de service : clueless in Paris, dont je lisais les péripéties avec intérêt et en hochant la tête bien avant d'avoir qu'elle soit devenue mon amie et qu'elle m'ait menacée d'abandonner la ville en août prochain, date à laquelle elle revient en Israël.

    Je survole –il faut bien travailler à un moment où à un autre – les blogs professionnels qui rapportent les événements culturels parisiens, dévoilent les endroits cachés de la ville, et les recommandations des critiques gastronomiques qui vont directement de leur blogs à ma boîte aux lettres.
    Le blog de Tenin, Paris Daily Photo, est l'un des plus adorables d'entre eux. Sur son blog, il fait monter chaque jour une photo de Paris, suivie d'un commentaire en excellent anglais,et les images et le texte racontent quelque chose sur la ville, sur les gens qui y vivent. Il photographie des ruelles secrètes dans le 9ème arrondissement où il habite, une vitrine avec des chaussures extraordinaires de Gauthier, des manifestations spectaculaires (la semaine dernière, par exemple, il y a eu une manifestation de nudistes à bicyclette pour protester contre la pollution urbaine créée par les voitures), un brin du muguet, symbole du 1er mai et des graffitis en français, incompréhensibles pour les étrangers. Tenin explique, commente et remet les choses dans leur contexte culturel, et de mes soixante secondes journalières sur Paris une minute est passée sur son post.

    Il a débuté son blog au moment où tous les gens à la mode le faisaient, et il a choisi de faire un blog photographique, car il pensait que l'écriture prendrait trop de son temps, et parce qu'il venait de recevoir un appareil photo. En trois ans, il a changé deux fois d'appareil photo, et est allé en se sophistiquant : il parcourt les journaux pour y chercher des spectacles intéressants, reçoit des invitations et des suggestions de professionnels et de ses lecteurs, il voyage, photographie, recherche son sujet, poste son article, répond aux commentaires et aux réactions, entretient des liens avec des bloggeurs aux intérêts similaires dans d'autres villes de par le monde, ce qui en plus du plaisir que cela lui procure, fait monter son nom sur le moteur de recherche Google.

    Et à propos de Google, Tenin ne reçoit pratiquement pas d'argent de son site, à part quelques centaines d'euros provenant de liens vers des sites commerciaux. Google, qui passe pour être une source de revenus sur Internet, l'a rejeté après qu'il ait pour la première fois appuyé sur un lien vers ses clients, acte qui représente une trahison des principes de Google et une contravension aux termes du contrat. Ce qui veut dire que comme tout le monde, Tenin fait son blog pour les commentaires qu'il reçoit. Après tout, à Paris, qui n'est pas seulement une grande ville pleine d'activités mais aussi une ville froide et stérile, il est facile d'être anonyme, radical libre, bourgeois libre, ou tout simplement libre. Mais Tenin, comme moi, veut certainement que sa présence soit enregistrée, quelque part, pour quelqu'un.

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  90. Esther, mille mercis. Je ne sais pas si vous avez changé quoi que ce soit dans le style de ce texte, mais c'est magnifiquement écrit.

    Je n'aurai qu'un mot: Toda Raba (תודה רבה)

    ;)

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  91. "Google Translate" was relatively useful in helping me to read this in English. Which seems ironic, when you get to the last paragraph (which it didn't translate very well). I'm not sure I understand that part!

    But I think I like you even more now, Eric. And I sure like Esther and Kinneret.

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  92. well, someone was faster than me !!
    The tramslation is excellent.Thank you esther and agin, thank you eric for those marevllous pictures !

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  93. Je viens juste de trouver un moment a lire cette traduction. et donc, moi aussi, je dis "merci" a Esther et a Kinneret d'avoir apporte un article merveilleux!

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  94. Esther, un grand merci pour ta traduction - and for the explanation of Pletzl/Platzl - I was going to correct the "Pretzel" thing. The diminutive "l" is also found in Southern/Eastern German. I am most familiar with Viennese.

    I did find that that poster was rather a rather blatant take on the male genitalia, but so what?

    And in Paris it is not Barbra Streisand, but Barbara (Monique Senf) another extraordinary singer - and songwriter - of Jewish origin. Non-francophones, please look her up. A lot of us love her dearly, and miss her.

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  95. There was a computer glitch - lagatta de montréal wrote the above comment.

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  96. And lagatta would also like to add that there is also an important Jewish area - shared with Maghrebis of Muslim background - in the 19th and 20th arrondissements. That was a particularly important neighbourhood in terms of working-class, Jewish-immigrant resistance to the Nazis/collaborators. There are many commemorative plaques in that area and way atop Ménilmontant above rue des Pyrénnées - there is a tiny square commemorating a French-Jewish teenaged girl in the resistance who was murdered by the Nazis.

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