Monday, September 29, 2008

Paul Newman's death


The death of a good man "La mort d'un type bien". That is how Le Journal du Dimanche - the only Sunday paper in France - reported the news today. He was such a famous actor that the news must have been everywhere in the world . I did not know he had this sauce business which profits go to charities. Pretty cool I must say. Last night they replaced two of the usual Sunday night movies by The Color of Money and the Sting.I could not see any of them as I'm still working on my site!

50 comments:

  1. I did not realize that there is only one Sunday paper in Paris. And yes, his death was big news here in the states. His company Newman's Own does more than the salad dressings, it actually makes my favorite lemonade as well as many other things...

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  2. It's true... the world does seems a slightly sadder place without Paul Newman. My grandmother loved him, and my mother... and me too! Thanks, Eric, for remembering him here on PDP.

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  3. 30-35 years ago I was desperately, deeply in love with Paul Newman! I always remained an admirer. His salad dressing wasn't half bad either, though I've never been a fan of ready-made spaghetti sauce. Apparently the charities which benefitted included many in far-flung Australia. I find that amazing. Reportedly he read every submission himself and made the final decisions.

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  4. Newspapers all over are going out of the "paper" business, and leaping to the internet. I happy the Paris Sunday paper is still around -- makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside. I'm so old fashioned. This is a fantastic B&W one color (red) photo. When I was in art college (in NYC), this was all the rage among the students. We did everything in B&W with a little red somewhere. We were so into this type of printing/painting/drawing, etc., that when we entered our respective fields in the arts, we carried the style over with us. We didn't let go of it for several years. It's a movement that someday may service at art auctions; but as for now, I think all those pieces of art are underground, or in private collections. You brought back memories, not only of Newman. Oh, to be young and built of steel. Newman sure had pretty eyes.

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  5. And let us not forget The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp for seriously ill children. He made his charitable contributions in a quiet, dignified manner, drawing as little attention as possible to himself. Somehow his large presence did not overshadow the good of his deeds.

    Golda Meir said: "Don' t be so humble, you're not that great". This could be said of many people in show business (and politics!), but happily did not apply to Mr. Newman. Now he is his Maker's Own.

    Rest in peace, Mr. Newman, you've earned it.

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  6. The death of Mr. Newman saddens many. My sympathy goes out to Mrs. Newman and the family...He will be greatly missed.

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  7. I read an article about him recently that gave statistics about how much money Newman's Own has made. If I'm not mistaken 100% of the profits go to charity. It was an astounding amount. But what really surprised me was that he put in his personal time and effort as well. Un type bien indeed.

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  8. He seems to have lived as honorably as anyone could in his circumstances. Many of the news stories fail to mention how abiding his live theater work was. Apparently he was set to direct something when he got his diagnosis, and it was only when he stepped down from that commitment that he mentioned being ill to the public. It's rare for celebrities to have that kind of control over their lives in the US. Thanks for this post, Eric.

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  9. We should all aspire to lead as honorable, kind and charitable life as Paul Newman. Petrea is right about the amount of money going to charity. He was also such a humble man, he didn't want people making a big deal about how philanthropic he was.

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  10. I was quite saddened to hear about Paul Newman - I didn't know he was sick. I think he and Joanne Woodward are people of real integrity. I think I read that they were celebrating nearly the same amount of years together (53)as Gramma ann and her husband. What an accomplishment of love and dedication in today's world, let alone when your work takes you to Hollywood. (I'll take another moment to say congratulations to you, GA - and to your husband - you can't hear that too often, right?!!)

    I'm also transported by the photos of him as a young man. I hadn't ever seen most of the pix that are on the net. My goodness, those eyes, those lips, that bod -- is it getting warm in here? ;)

    Back to reality, I didn't know there is only one Sunday paper in France. Its such an American ritual to read the paper on Sundays. Have there never been Sunday papers, or have they disappeared?

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  11. There is a kind of celebratory section (dancing, drinking, living the high life in New York City) in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" where the film shifts to black and white and is done in a bit of a jerky silent movie style.

    The second or third time I saw this I became overwhelmed with a deep sense of loss: those magical good times shared by the characters in this section were irretrievably gone, long faded into a distant past, a high point, perhaps even the high point of their lives, yet lived casually for their not knowing this. From this apex all tumbled away, leaving nought.

    The film that was depicting that past is past and is tumbling away itself. Conrad Hall, the cinematographer of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and "Road to Perdition" is gone. Paul Newman (choke) is gone. However, for the time remaining in our own lives we will have such bittersweet memories of him. The magical good times he created for us to share in do live on. That he will not is painful.

    I'm sorry. I think I hear someone singing La Marseillaise. I'm glad that I am alone as I write this.

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  12. Here's a picture of the front bottle label of his original flavor of salad dressing. You'll notice the French language touches, which were meant to be humorous mock-pretentiousness for an American prepared food product. He was always ready to poke fun at himself.

    Click here for a full sized image.

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  13. I loved his later work. I don't believe that he was any better than his acting in:

    Nobody's Fool - He was nominated for Best Actor.

    The Verdict - Robert Redford was originally slated to star in this film, but he was uncomfortable with the script. Newman was nominated for Best Actor. If you decide to watch this movie, look closely at the closing argument given by Newman. In the background, you can glimpse a then-unknown Bruce Willis.

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  14. Carrie~~~Thanks again. You're right my husband and I were married 50 years on July 3, 2008. I don't know what the Newmans Anniversary date is, but I understand they also got married in 1958. 50 years seems along time, but to me it seems like yesterday.

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  15. (Less a silent-film-jerky section of BCATSK and more a series of period sepia photos seamed with posed sepia photos done on the set of "Hello Dolly.")

    The amount of money of Paul Newman's charitable contributions have been noted around as somewhere between $175,000,000 and $200,000,000.

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  16. Eric, you have captured a sad day indeed. The colors do get one's attention, too.

    Gramma Ann congrats for sticking it out for 50 years. Okay, I didn't mean for it to sound quite like that! I'm raising my October Fest ale to you as I type. You are indeed a SUPER GRAM!;-)

    As for Mr. Newman, he exemplified HUMANITARIAN to the end. Political-cans and ego-centric celebs take notice! He was also a tremendous race car driver and race car enthusiast...Mario Andretti was his main man. [BTW...I love his balsamic salad dressing.]

    My glass is raised again...and my guitar gently weeps for this amazing man.

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  17. I too think that he was a man of integrity and had a gift of generousity. I read yesterday that his company, Newman's Own had given away $250 million. There are several of his products that I buy because they taste really good, but knowing that they are helping kids is also a great thing. The thing I'm most impressed with..his 53 year marriage to Joanne Woodward. He was the one who said, "Why go out for hamburger when there is steak at home?" I have to agree with him there. Our hearts go out to his family in their time of loss.

    Gramma Ann--Congrats on your 53 years as well!!! :)

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  18. Christie~~~Thanks, 1958 to 2008 is 50 years, oh well what is 3 years! hee, hee. ;)

    Coltrane~~~Thanks, SUPER DRUMMER BOY;)

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  19. Gramma Ann, looking at my earlier lame congrats post let me resubmit. You see, in the spirit of Cool Hand Luke, I think what "we got here is...failure to communicate." CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU AND YOUR HUBBY ON 50 YEARS OF MARRIAGE! THAT IS AN AMAZING FEAT.
    As for Newman, like Dragline said of Luke, "he's a natural-born world-shaker." [I always loved that line.]

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  20. 1st off, congrats to gramma ann and her husband! Wooo!

    2nd off to Coltrane, I left you a response on yesterdays post because it just didn't feel right leaving it on this one.

    Now to Paul Newman. I think it's definitely a testament to him that people of all ages know him and love him for both his acting and his humanitarianism (but especially for the latter of the two). Sally Field was quoted today as saying that God doesn't often make perfect people but he sure made Mr. Newman perfect. Judging by all I know of him I'd have to agree with her. I raise my current packet of Newman's Own salad dressing to him in honor of his life and work. Thanks for a great post, Eric!

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  21. Congratulations, Gramma Ann! That's wonderful.

    David, I'm glad you mentioned "Nobody's Fool." That was one of his finest.

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  22. The words “noble” and “nobility” rarely make an appearance these days in relation to living persons. When they do, we have every right to be suspicious. And, when they are used in relation to celebrities, we ought to be doubly suspicious.

    Not so in the case of Paul Newman, who seemed genuinely humble, never seeking – or, in my opinion, ever receiving - undue attention for being what we should all be: generous. Of course, we can’t all give as much as he did: but there are many who can, and don’t. Even those who do, display little of the unfussy, unpretentious humility exhibited by Newman, who clearly never aimed to profit either personally or professionally from his charity (which we now know ran into the hundreds of millions).

    The fact that his death coincides with the “bailout” of Wall Street’s fat cats, a handful of whom have landed softly on all fours (thanks to their “golden parachutes”), reminds us that though “noble” and “nobility” may seem like epithets from a bygone era, the word “ignoble” is one that still has an awful lot of currency today.

    How different things would be for America (and for us all) if needy were not routinely (and in most cases involuntarily) made to pay for the crimes of the greedy!

    PS Gramma Ann: Félicitations!

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  23. Wow - $200,000,000 - I had no idea he'd given so much - what a fantastic legacy. I heard he was an underappreciated race car driver, too. (He probably liked it that way.) He apparently came in second one year in the 24 hour Le Mans race. Pretty intense.

    When asked about racing, he said he liked the fact that it was so concrete - not "mushy" like movies where everyone had an opinion of your work - you just were wherever you were. I totally want to find Nobody's Fool now!

    Tall Gary -- what a beautifully expressed sentiment, but I'm sorry you're feeling sad. (I hope I'm not being too forward. Please forgive me if so. Your honesty just made me want to respond.) I hope you feel better soon.

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  24. Congratulations to Gramma Ann. Well done.

    Thanks for the nod, Tall Gary. I, too, felt sadness at the news of M. Newman's passing. All my favorite scenes passed before my eyes.

    "I can't swim!"
    "Ha ha ha ha, swim? The fall will probably kill us!"

    Sort of like life. The hell with it. Jump, and start paddling. You just may swim for 53+ years. You may crack a cymbal, but that can be fixed. Don't forget to dance. And sing, even if you are crying. Sing LOUD!

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  25. Jeff..."The fall with probably kill us!" Fantastic line...never tire of it! "Jump, and start paddling." I am and you know what, the water may be cold, but it ain't that bad. Just happy to be paddlin' these days. Anyway, I hear ya singin'from the Twin Cities! Now, about those Twins...we should talk. ;-)

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  26. This is a great capture Eric. I probably would have walked right by this sign, but you thought about PDP. Tall Gary said, "I'm glad that I am alone as I write this." You certainly are not alone big guy.

    Uselaine, thanks for the photo above. I never paid attention to that before, but he was very clever Paul was.

    My favourite was The Sting. REAL ragtime music in the entire film. I can remember learning the music at the time and it made for many difficult music lessons.

    Happy Anniversary Gramma Ann. What is your secret?!?!

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  27. Eric, so kind of you to mention the passing of a great American today.
    Paul Newman was way ahead of his time when he created his wonderful food products for charity. I love his organic spelt pretzels and organic Ginger-O's creme filled cookies. He even made them without all the yucky unhealthy oils too. & I always feel good buying them because I know 100% of the profits go to charity.
    RIP Paul Newman. We will miss you.

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  28. Hey Miguel, I wish you good morning as I get ready to say good night to all the fine folks. As Petrea might say, welcome to your "Zenday." Hope it's a good one for you.

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  29. Thanks Coltrane. Be sure to see yesterday's comments...it might help you to have some jazzy dreams.

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  30. Eh oui, il parait que c'etait un type bien.

    I liked a lot of his movies. Who can forget Hud, Cool Hand Luke, The Hustler, The Verdict, to name only a few.

    I don't know if it's true or not but I was told by locals that Paul Newman learned how to race cars (or at least used to go drive) not far from here, at the Sears Point race school in Sonoma County. ??

    RIP, Mr. Newman, and thanks for all the great stuff.

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  31. Thanks Eric for the tribute to Paul Newman. I loved his unpretentious nature, refusing to give advice, not talking about his private life, never signing an autograph.

    Congrats gramma ann!

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  32. I echo everyone's sadness about the loss of Paul Newman, and the amazement at what a modest humanitarian he was. When I get home I'll have my own Paul Newman film festival, and serve Newman's Own food. One film worth searching out is "Paris Blues" from 1961. Newman and Sidney Poitier are jazz musicians in Paris (Louis Armstrong is also in the film) but they get a bit sidetracked when American tourists Joanne Woodward and Diahann Carroll arrive in Paris. Fun film with great music.

    Gramma Ann you go girl! (as the kids say). May you have 50 more years of wedded bliss!

    And Carrie the Sunday newspaper ritual can be done on Saturday in Paris. My college friend Eric buys Le Figaro (that comes with Madame Figaro magazine, which I grab first), Financial Times Weekend, le Parisien, Int'l Herald Tribune (weekend edition) and El Pais (news from Spain). Pick up a bag of assorted pastries and there goes Saturday morning!

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  33. jeff & coltrane~~~"Jump..." is one of my favorite lines also, In my minds eye I can just see them huddled on the cliff ready to jump, and who could ever forget the bicycle scene with Paul and Kate and the song in the background, "Raindrops keep falling on my head..." Loved that scene.

    Michael~~~"What is my secret?" To keep falling in love many times...but always with the same man...;)

    Lucio...Jeff...Jill...Katie~~~Thanks, you are all to kind. And Katie Happy vacation..

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  34. I'm adding my voice to the congrats to you, Gramma Ann, and to your husband. 50 years, waouh! What an example! And thank you for sharing your secret!

    The JDD (Journal Du Dimanche) mentioned by Eric had (only) 2 special pages about Paul Newman. And here is what this great man said one day, about his loooong story with Joanne Woodward : "I have a nice steak at home. So why would I look outside for a hamburger?" ... (might not be the exact translation).
    I can imagine the light in his ice blue eye and the small ironic smile on his face....

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  35. I remember a few years back seeing an interview with Paul and Joanne together. They were just a lovely couple, so comfortable with each other, and even after their many years of wedded bliss, you could still see the love and respect they had for each other. I loved watching them acting together in the few movies they did together. Katie mentioned the movie they made, "Paris Blues" I too enjoyed that movie along with his many others, I think my all time favorite was "Butch... and Sundance"

    Thib~~~Thanks...

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  36. Really sad to hear about the death of such a wonderful human being.
    As a child I became interested in Paul Newman when my friend pointed out that he was a Capricorn - she was wrong, he was Aquarius - and since then I watched most, if not all, his films.
    Although I loved his acting it was other aspects of his personality I admired mostly. I was so impressed with was the number of charities he was involved with; the amount money he donated to so many good causes and above all, the time and effort he dedicated to all these humanitarian activities.
    A great loss indeed...

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  37. Gramma: What is my secret?" To keep falling in love many times...but always with the same man...;) AWWWWWW! That is just the sweetest thing. I wish everyone could find a love like that in their lives!

    Michael/Miguel: DId you get another personality I didn't know about. Oh wait, you are a gemini! I just wish one of those personalities would stop trying to get me all jazzed. Are you even serious?!? Just stop before I start plannign a little road trip when I don't even know exactly where I'd be going.

    UGH! You've even got me making goofy little typos!

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  38. The hole in the wall gang, (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid) has their main man back amongst them in the time honored silver screen tradition. He will live on as an individualist actor who set his own high standards for not only acting but an admirable personal life. Semper Fidelis

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  39. "Paris Blues"--how could I not mention that on PDP? Thanks, Katie. I believe Newman and Woodward met on this movie, starting the beginning of a beautiful friendship. So, Paris Blues was a beginning, and the PDP photo completes the cycle. Eric, do you remember where you took this photo? Maybe there is a scene from Paris Blues that was filmed there. Hmm, the 13th...I remember one scene on the Seine, with Notre Dame and le Pont de l'Archeveche in the background. This probably was filmed in the 5th, though.

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  40. How could one not love Paul Newman?? Wonderful actor, an amazing human being and married to one of my all time favorite actresses; Joanne Woodward. His life had it's share of sadness and tragedy and yet he didn't surrender. He will be missed, and the photo is proof of that. Merci!

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  41. Cali, "Golda Meir said: "Don' t be so humble, you're not that great". Merci for sharing that. Tonight at sundown started a big Jewish holiday.

    Christie, "Why go out for hamburger when there is steak at home?" Good one, merci for sharing.

    Katie, Merci for the Paris film info. I will definitiely watch it -- I didn't know that it existed.

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  42. This week i lost two of my favorite people. Paul Newman, an extraordinary human being...who did a little of everything to bring this world to a better place.
    And an equally extraorinary human being, Milt Davis (79). Milt, great football player at UCLA and the NFL, changed people's lives for the good with an infectuous personality and a character that wanted to make each individual he met, a better person. While not as public a figure as Newman, Davis carved his name in the hearts and minds of people that were less fortunate to start in life, but gained momentum with Milt's words leading them on. Both giants in the human saga...both loved and always remembered.

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  43. Yes, it's quite sad. I LOVE the Newman's Own products. He/they have some really yummy salsas. My favorite is the peach salsa - Mmmmmmmmmmm
    You can find more information on his charitable enterprise on the Newman's Own site.
    And, no, I don't work for them or hold stock. ;)

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