Wednesday, January 10, 2007

D-Day!


It's not Les soldes nor The Sales but THE soldes! Funny how in French, when we want to show something is really big we use "The" before the French word, exactly like in English one uses "Le" for the same purpose. Anyway, it's today and it's gonna be BIG! I took this photo last night (well on the evening of the 9th) at the Gap store near Le Printemps where they will also start the Soldes - after a little strike in the morning though (I am not kidding!)

88 comments:

  1. I can't help noticing that 'The Soldes' is an anagram of Sold These, kinda freaky, Huh!

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  2. Well, there you have it. My nephew works in the PR Department at The Gap home office in San Francisco. I've sent him this link. Now all the Gappers will know about Paris Daily Photo!

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  3. That little tidbit is funny Eric!

    But, in the U.S., we don't use "les" for the same reason. Instead, it is used to make something seem sophisticated. If a company want to project that image, french is sometimes used. Even a lot of our wines have a french name...lol!

    French=sophistication. Now, doesn't that make you feel good ;)

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  4. may i ask a question...

    for all you french speakers out there i've noticed that sometimes the suffix "-ing" gets added to words to create a certain effect ... is this to add an english/american flavor?

    also what the heck does 'relooking' mean? it's an interesting conglomeration of both the past and present tenses in english, and it's not in my dictionary. (french or english lol !!!)

    barbara

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  5. Oui, Les Soldes are supposed to start on Jan 10. Not sure about the meaning of The soldes. Might appeal to a younger public?
    At any rate, les soldes are going one for 4 weeks at least and unless you have a very special item in mind, better wait a few days and crowds and prices will go down.

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  6. Alright someone, buy a funky, loud shirt from that store Eric took a picture of on the 4th and send it to me! I promise I'll pay for it!

    Susan's right, we usually use French or a terrible mix of English and French to make things seem more sophisticated. Unless you're my husband, who uses it to make things seem more dim-witted! Anyways, we Americans just think you French are tooo sexy and chic, so we use you to make our boring things seem sexy and chic! Too bad I know the truth about you all! Someone told me you're all nose-pickers, among other terrible terrible things!!!

    Happy shopping everyone!

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  7. Alright someone, buy a funky, loud shirt from that store Eric took a picture of on the 4th and send it to me! I promise I'll pay for it!

    Susan's right, we usually use French or a terrible mix of English and French to make things seem more sophisticated. Unless you're my husband, who uses it to make things seem more dim-witted! Anyways, we Americans just think you French are tooo sexy and chic, so we use you to make our boring things seem sexy and chic! Too bad I know the truth about you all! Someone told me you're all nose-pickers, among other terrible terrible things!!!

    Happy shopping everyone!

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  8. Eric, do you mean there's really going to be a strike tomorrow? At the Gap or at all the stores or what?

    Soosha, do you REALLY want a shirt from that store? Of so, what size and colour preference? Stripes or polka-dots? Loud or semi-loud?

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  9. Hey Buzzgirl, just went to your blog and don't seem to find a place for comments anymore. Are you in solitary mode now?

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  10. Michael, so at last the truth surfaces. You went to Buzzgirl instead of coming to me. How COULD you Michael? You don't know what you've done to me...


    Well Eric what's new, i suppose it's the same as le Weekend isn't it. I can't see us saying 'le sales' though. Like Soosha says, french articles are usually used to add sophistication value. I admit to it on some painting titles too, 'les fleurs' sounds infinitely better than 'flowers'. How boring is that?
    And what's a French morning without as you so charmingly put it, a 'little strike' over coffee?
    What will you be searching for in the bargains, Eric. I think a leather jacket for your scooter garb (where's the picture i requested of that by the way?)

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  11. Sale prices are closer to what items are actually worth. Even at that, prices are ridiculous. I am pleased with the tip about "The". I start French classes at the university tomorrow. As I mentioned to my friends in a recent email, I will have a real live French lady for a prof. My first native speaker of French in my three years of study. Imagine asking a question about the language and actually getting the answer. She is from Lyon and has only been here for a few years. Three years and I still sound like a kindergarten French student with an American accent. Oh, well!

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  12. its really interesting. As I know (and as I experienced in France) French are very proud of their language...there is a certain resistance to speak other languages especially English.

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  13. In English we call it Franglais. In French - errrr - Englench?

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  14. That's pretty funny about the "THE" in front of words Eric! And HEY! Did y'all know that "THE" is my last name? Isn't that cool...NOT! EVERYONE and their BROTHER sees my name on checks or on my bank ATM card and asks, "Amy, THEEEEEEEEEEEE?" "Or THUUUUUH?"
    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! It's pronounced like "TAY" Thank you very much (and it's NOT French OR Scandinavian...it's Chinese)...maybe I should change it to Soldes...that sounds better, Amy Soldes! LOL! And OOO, I want a shirt too Michael...but not from THAT store! Maybe Soosha's shopping for someone else hmmm? ERIC! We've decided on cold, rainy or bright & sunny UK for our trip this year...and instead of Spring it's gonna be in FEBRUARY!!! Wish there was some way for us to count on you coming over to join the DP party I'm planning!!! ;)

    We'll probably set foot on ground there on Saturday, the 17th..and leave the following Saturday...or maybe even Sunday..wanna stay as LOOONG as possible! ;) Keep it in mind...you ARE the Father of DP ya know...we'd love nothing MORE than to be graced by your presence! =) xo

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  15. Le parking, Le smoking, and similar imports were at one time considered cool by young French people, and violently deprecated by the Academie Francaise. Le smoking, by the way, is based on a total misunderstnding of what a "smoking jacket" is -- one of those linguistic sins whose culprit will never be found.

    In English we have a very strange emphatic use of the word THE, to indicate celebrity. For example, if somebody said "I met somebody called Julia Roberts" you might reply, incredulously, "You mean the Julia Roberts???" And we pronounce it with a long e, like THEE, instead of the usual short e. Ain't language amazing?

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  16. Will tomorrow's post be a picture of the crowds? Do people turn out en mass for sales?

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  17. The Soldes? I bet those are les immortels from L'Académie française who are strikng in front of the store today;-)

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  18. Barbara: I believe "relooking" means to get a new look, but I'm not 100% certain.

    As to the how and why of the mixing of the "ing" with French words, I do not know the logic behind it. Sometimes when I go back to France, and I hear my sister or other members of my family use these words, it irritates me to no end, because 1) they don't make any sense to me, and 2) they don't necessarily mean what they sound like in English.

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  19. Stu Harris: I think the French used to do the same thing at some point. I remember hearing a lot about "La Callas" (the great singer Maria Callas) but it's also used pejoratively, I think, or used to be.

    Language sure is tricky. I admire the efforts of all people trying to learn French as a second language because it sure isn't easy.

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  20. Barbara: "relooking"? There is no such word. Who says that? Revisit, yes. Review, yes. Relook, no.

    Ok, that's my English lesson for the day. Now can anyone explain to me how an arrangement of the alphabet can be either male or female???? LOL!

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  21. Michael,

    I don't know what, if any, problem there is with my comments. There may have just been a "new" Blogger glitch. Again. It'll be great when all the bugs are worked out!

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  22. ...but it's also used pejoratively...

    Oh yes, the perfect example is "LA Streisand", used by journalists to refer to the fact that she's an arrogant, irritating bitch.

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  23. I'm a journalist and i've never used La Streisand but then i don't think she's an arrogant, irritating bitch either...

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  24. Please let's remember that advertising is not necessarily language in the traditional sense. The marketing/advertising industry does some strange things to get noticed. But don't single out one industry: we are now "accessing" and "inputting" things (noun-becomes-verb), and so on. How many nations use "ciao" to be hip...or whatever.

    Le Jeff

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  25. I was in the "Grands Magasins" on monday, and there were very few people shopping.
    I wondered why, but now i understand: people were waiting for the "Soldes"...
    My friend has bought a "chemisier" yesterday, few hours before the "Soldes". At least, she didn't have to fight for it ;-)

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  26. Eric, we now need a photo of ' les arènes de Lutèce" to calm down everybody ! Par Toutatis !

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  27. Wow, so much to comment on...

    Lynn, you are quite demanding aren't you? I have to spread my comments around you know, and don't be jealous, but I've known Buzzgirl a longer time.

    As for "relooking", in fact it is used to describe a "makeover" in english. Just like a "lifting" refers to a "face lift" in english.

    Now, for the only consistent french rule I can find Johnny, that you can test on your new teacher tomorrow: All english words used in french are masculine.

    Le parking
    Le marketing
    Le web
    Le phoning (call centre)

    and of course...
    Le cheeseburger et le coca-cola!

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  28. Is there a French equivalent to the phrase "Shop 'til you drop?"

    I live in California and we have a store called Target (which is sort of like a Monoprix), and people will sometimes jokingly pronounce Target as it would be pronounced in French to make it sound more upscale.

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  29. Pont girl - Do you mean the ever so chic Targé?

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  30. Oooh....I love sales! Do they say "le credit card" in France too Michael?

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  31. Hmmm...if you think "relook" is an actual word, it must one of those crazy Florida things ;)

    I need some advice from anyone in Paris. I am so confused! I looked up that hotel that was recommended (Hotel des Grandes Ecoles) but I am wondering if it is too much in the 5th. The 5th is known to be a little ghettoish these days...not authentic Paris anymore...so I'm a little hesitant about it. It looks to be about 4-5 blocks east of the Sorbonne.

    Alternatively, I've found a few hotels in Marais (which I've been told is kind of the same environment as Soho/Greenwich Village in NYC. But is it too far for walking to the 6th??? But then again, I don't think I want to stay in the 6th again since I spent so much time there last time. I was just asked to go on this trip so I wasn't planning to come there again so soon and I feel a little rushed.

    Help! But

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  32. oh! Ok. But "look" is not a french word (confused).

    Michael, I need your help!!! Please tell me where to stay! We are meeting tonight to decide where to stay....I need input.

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  33. Michael: That's the one - I just don't know how to get the accent above my letters (je suis computer challenged...)

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  34. sia: The 5th is great, don't sweat it. The Marais (3rd) is cool, too, and walking is one of the great pleasures in Paris. Frankly, I haven't spent as much time as I would like in the heart of the Latin Quarter, so I say the 5th would be great around le Hotel des Grand Ecoles. (Where did you stay in the 6th, by the way? I was right behind St. Sulpice.)

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  35. Pont girl - try holding down the ALT key and typing the numbers "130". See if that gives you an accent. You can then try with other combinations of numbers to find the other accents (I believe).

    SIA - see my comment to Johnny above about the english/french words.

    As for where to stay, I am the worse one to ask. You know what it's like when you live in a city and never stay in a hotel.

    Do you want a small hotel, quaint?
    A 4-5 star hotel with all ammenities?
    Are you willing to walk/take the metro?

    That might help give people an idea so that they can suggest some places.

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  36. Ceux qui sont "sales"...qu'ils aillent prendre une douche ! :)

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  37. Jeff, Jeff, Jeff....when ARE you going to start that daily photo blog yourself? I hate to see your name up there all in black letters. You're way to interesting a person to be sans avatar, sans blog...

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  38. LOL Falbala! Sorry to leave another comment here, but every time I go to click off there's another one.

    For non-French speakers, falbala is saying something to the affect that those who are "sales"(which means "dirty" or "unclean" in French) need to take a shower!

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  39. I didn't mean which hotel...I am more interested in replies to my previous comments regarding areas.

    I am nervous about that one I mentioned in the 5th...see above.

    3rd? Is that good? Or should I stay in 6th or near 6th?

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  40. I meant the 4th...not the 3rd.

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  41. And this would be Megan's favorite thing about Paris!

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  42. Wow after being in the desert, Michael, we suddenly find we are SATURATED in you! Tis divine darling, demanding though i am, it's all in jest and Buzzgirl's a lucky girl is all i can say! Buzz away dear Michael and the rest of us will be simply happy with an occasional visit and utterance. Your words are such fun.

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  43. Hotel tip:
    http://www.hotel-loiret.fr/

    It's in the 3eme, on the delihtfully-named Rue des Mauvais Garcons. And a bargain.

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  44. Susan in Atlanta: "relooking"? There is no such word.

    LOL, I rest my case!! Actually it's a French word, if you can believe that.

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  45. Ah....a woman's favorite day! THEE Sales!

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  46. By the way, I stayed at the Hotel du Loiret, I think, rue des Mauvais Garçons. I'm not sure about the name of the Hotel but I'm 100% certain about the street name.

    The location is ideal, because it's right at the center of Paris, in the Marais, behind Hotel de Ville, where you can walk to pretty much everything!! The rooms are modest and rather small by US Standards, but it's clean, comfortable, separate bathroom, small TV and phone in the room. The area is quite safe. No elevator though, so if you have a lot of luggage and you're on the top floor, ouch...

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  47. And if you're looking for a restaurant in the rue des Mauvais garçons, live it up to PDP ;)

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  48. I'm waiting for a late phone call so whilst doing so am looking out for Eric's change of photo but nothing yet... i reckon he's at a midnight sale kitting himself out in Gap stuff. Or maybe posing on his scooter for that pic i'm dying to see of his new machine.

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  49. LOOOOOOOOOOL Lynn!
    Caught in the act...

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  50. By the way, susan in atlanta: 5th is known to be a little ghettoish these days...not authentic Paris anymore...

    Says who? I disagree. I don't see how it can get more "authentic Paris" than it is.

    If you are referring to small touristic area near St. Michel with a ton of restaurants and clothing store, that's fine, but that is a very confined area.

    There are tons of truly historical streets, buildings and areas the likes of which you cannot see in the States, around the 5th... Google "arenes de lutece" and see for yourself.

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  51. Hey Michael,

    What about "la star?" Is that feminine because it's often used to describe a female personality? Would a male one be "le star?" I've never seen that, but I've often seen "la star." Should I just stop reading Paris Match and read something with some substance, already?

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  52. oooh Eric i knew it!

    Ruth Paris Match mmm i miss that mag so much. I used to read it all the time and haven't been able to buy it for ages. I would often get it at the airport but don't go there much now, having moved away. I used to so enjoy it.

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  53. susan in atlanta: I had a great time at the hotel I stayed at in the 11th. Hotel Lyon Mulhouse half a block away from the Bastille. Clean rooms, reasonably priced, multi-lingual staff, and AN ELEVATOR!

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  54. FYI, the French are not the only one to use foreign words... The Anglo Saxon world to. Look at this (and make sure you scroll down the page).

    Quite interesting.

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  55. Oh Eric!!!! As if I don't have enough trouble having to look at his face here! You put a link where the first thing I see is a picture of the idiot??? Thanks. Thanks a lot. teeheehee..wink.

    Ok, now I'm really confused. I said earlier that it is not an English word. Which it is not. I am sure of that. Then someone told me it was a French word. Ok. Now, Eric said, "FYI, the French are not the only one to use foreign words." So, is it considered to be an English word or a French word (even though there is no such word in English...just want to be clear about that). So, do the French think that it is an English word? I am so confused!

    Nevertheless, you are so right that others use foreign words! I've said that before on your site. There are lots of french words that make it into the English language.

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  56. Tomate: Well, regarding the 5th: I'm sorry if that sounded insulting to the 5th but I am going by what I've read a number of places. I'll quote Rick Steve's (Europe lover/traveler/guide writer/TV Travel shows), "Sleeping in the Luxembourg area offers a true Left Bank experience without a hint of the low-end commotion of the nearby Latin Quarter tourist ghetto." And if you knew Rick Steve's, he tends to be a budget traveler(ie: cheap)...more so than me...so if he says that....well....I want to stay clear.

    Also, I've read other sources that say many of the restaurants there are not French but tend to have a lot of gyro places, etc. Mostly owned by immigrants...not to say that there's anything wrong with immigrants...my ancestors were once immigrants and have several immigrant friends....but....recent North African immigrant restaurants versus authentic French restaurants (imagine me holding both hands in the air "weighing" the two)....I think I'll go with the French ones. Hope I did not offend any north africans! Hey....I live in America...everything is totally PC (politically correct) that I now feel quilty for saying what I really think! But notice I didn't erase it ;)

    I technically stayed in the 5th before but it was right at the border of the 5th and 6th and I tended to go into the 6th....never went deep in the 5th. So I don't know...I'm just going by what I read and hear. But, I do know that a lot of people say the 5th but are really referring to the 6th.

    Anyway, I want to be close to the river....center of town and we've decided on Marais for a new experience. There is Hotel de la Bretonnerie and Hotel Castex that I'm looking at. Anyone know those two?

    Thanks again for everyone's help!!! I really appreciate all the input!

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  57. thanks for the feedback on 'relooking', and i think that ms. farcie and michael nailed it with the translation of a 'redo' of sorts...it was taken from a french design (interior) magazine, and that was the idea that i gleaned from the rest of the sentence as well. if i can come across the article again, i will post the french, which i'm sure will make it much clearer to those in the know.

    also, i came across 'le smoking' today in text from an exhibit at the metropolitan museum in nyc of nan kempner's haute couture collection. as far as it's origin is concerned, it seems to be related somehow to yves st. laurent and her individualistic stylism in wearing the trench coat he had designed ... not sure about anything more, will have to look into that one.

    and i have to disagree with the assessment of the 5th being a bit ghettoish .. or perhaps not 'authentic' paris? the hotel des grandes ecole is just one of hundreds of hotels in paris ... it's was recommended in the book STYLE CITY: PARIS, i took the recommendation and stayed there and it was quaint and lovely, like a bed and breakfast would be. it is steps away from rue mouffetard, and i'm fairly certain that's still considered to be 'authentic paris'. in the ghetto? if you're referring to people of non-european background, i tend to enjoy that mix, but it's not in that vicinity ....

    place vendome it's not ... it depends on what you're looking for.

    hope that was helpful. :)

    barbara

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  58. Barbara, he did say very good things about that hotel actually. He used the word "idyllic" to be exact. I was just worried about the surrounding area when I added up all the other things I had read. But what I read about the hotel was very nice. It's just hard to decide when you haven't seen the area and you've read some negative (but not knowing exactly where the negative is located within the area). Know what I mean?

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  59. Plus, I like the description of Marais....soho-like, trendy bars, etc. Residential and tourist. That's what I like.

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  60. Oh sure I'm familiar with Rick Steve; he's a geek. No, wait, let me take that back. He's an idiot. Well, OK, may be not, since he managed to make money doing something everybody else dreams of doing, but still, don't take everything he says so seriously.

    I saw a marathon of his little clips one day when PBS was running a fund-raiser and I was playing couch potato. Sure it was informative, and it's always fun to see movie clips of a foreign country with some kind of inside into the culture.

    But honestly, what do you think the guy can say in 1/2 hour or 45 minutes about an entire city that people who live there all their lives have trouble keeping up with and still don't know 100%?!!

    When he was doing the Paris clip, he demanded (on film) to eat in one sitting: escargots, frog legs, steak frites, and a couple of other things, I forget what they were (rolling eyes). He did say that his "French companion" or the waiter, I forget, was a little shocked, but since he wanted to try "everything French"... or something like that. Ahem. I don't know any French person who eats escargots or frog legs that often. if you're gonna follow that advice as well, I hope you remember to pack your Alka Seltzer ...

    Don't fall into that trap. There is more to the Latin quarter than these 2 streets where the tourists congregate, and even around there there is more to it than Greek restaurants.

    So called "Chinese Food" restaurants in Paris or even Gyros taste COMPLETELY DIFFERENT than they do in Paris. But hey, don't take my word for it. :-)

    You are worried about safety and stuff. That's understandable. Well, here is my advice for you:

    Whenever you are in Paris, anywhere in Paris, especially the most touristic areas, or crowded areas, train stations, subways, crowded streets, well, wherever there is a crowd of people really, ALWAYS pay attention to your stuff and hold your bag very closely against you as you would in the New York subway during peek hours, or in any other big city in the States.

    Trust your intuition, use common sense, have good comfortable walking shoes rather than pretty ones, and most of all, HAVE FUN!!!

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  61. Oh, yeah, I forgot. Perso, I think the area surrounding the Centre Pompidou / Les Halles is about 100 times more getthoish than the Latin Quarter.

    Did Rick Steeve write a book or something? I'd love to read it.

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  62. PS. "Sleeping in the Luxembourg area offers a true Left Bank experience without a hint of the low-end commotion of the nearby Latin Quarter tourist ghetto."

    Oh, a "tourist ghetto." I see. Like all these American tourists maybe? ;)

    Seriously, there is a lot more tourists towards the center possibly because there is a large concentration of monuments and stuff to see, but I find it hard to believe that Luxembourg would be a cheaper area than the 5th.

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  63. Actually, sorry it's me again, but I wanted to clarify that the 5th doesn' just mean St. Michel to me, it goes all the way back to where the Arenes de Luteces are.

    Pfeew... somebody please cut off my Internet connection? :)

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  64. Bush speaks French now? Bush who can't even say 'NUCLEAR' properly speaks French?!! Ha!

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  65. Tomate, you crack me up. ;-) Susan is just trying to make a good decision and it's hard if you don't know the ins and outs. I love that she can get all of the different opinions here though. She'll have fun no matter what.

    I'd just add on the safety part... bring a copy of your passport with you to carry around and leave the original in the hotel safe.

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  66. DAMN TOMATE! Do you own property in the 5th or what?

    Has nothing to do with safety. I just don't want to be in a dumpy area. So...chillax :P

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  67. Upset Tomate: I just finished reading all your comments...it took a while so a few more responses:

    "but I find it hard to believe that Luxembourg would be a cheaper area than the 5th". It's not cheaper...the 5th is cheaper. Cheap is not a consideration. Luxembourg is nice, I've stayed there before, homebase was the 6th...I really liked it there.

    And last but not least, I had to respond to this: "Oh, a "tourist ghetto." I see. Like all these American tourists maybe? ;)" Well...I guess that remark will prepare me for the friendly welcomed feeling I should expect...I might as well get ready for it. And seriously, I wasn't going to say anything, but that attitude is exactly why the Paris Tourist board created that ad campaign. It was in response to lowered tourism from the U.K. and a study result that told them Brits don't like the way tourists are treated. So...they smartly decided to make fun of themselves in hopes that it would bring the U.K. tourists back. So there! ;P (picture me making one of those famous facial expressions on the ad).

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  68. Susan: And last but not least, I had to respond to this: "Oh, a "tourist ghetto." I see. Like all these American tourists maybe? ;)" Well...I guess that remark will prepare me for the friendly welcomed feeling I should expect...

    I was making fun of Rick Steve, not you, but if you want to take it personally, that's OK with me. I was actually kind of 1/2 joking earlier but let me tell you something straight out. When you go to Paris, you might need to leave your "sensitive" side at home. I mean it. Attitude? You haven't seen attitude, yet. Trust me. Anyway.

    Most (US) people I know go to Paris and have a good time. They see the good, they see the bad, they come home, tell their friends about it. Some like French food, and some don't. Some see more good than bad, and some see more bad than good. But they're glad to have checked it out and usually they come back with far more positive than negative stories.

    Paris is not a paradise by all means, I'll be the first one to tell you that. But Rick Steve is still an idiot if seriously thinks the 5th is confined to the area immediately around St. Michel. Enuff said.

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  69. You were right when you said on earlier posts (November?) that you guys really like to argue!

    Well, I don't think he's an idiot by any means. He writes great travel books and loves Europe. I have used his books in the past (as has many, many people) and found him to be right on and very helpful.

    I've been to Paris before so clearly know what to expect.

    That quote from the book really struck a nerve since you were so offended by it. Even to point to call him an idiot. Gee, Tomate, don't take it so personal. The "sensitive" one is you.

    I was just trying to compare area so as to make a good decision.

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  70. Girls, girls, girls (or to be politically correct...ladies, ladies, ladies)...

    I can confirm that the sales are really hopping now (you remember? the photo? LOL) as the Metro was packed with people with shopping bags. I think you both should go out and buy me something and you'll feel muuuucccchhh better!

    Bises!

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  71. You were right when you said on earlier posts (November?) that you guys really like to argue!

    "Us guys?" tsk, tsk, tsk... I'm sitting on my hands right now so I won't complete my thought before posting that comment. Not easy.

    That quote from the book really struck a nerve since you were so offended by it. Even to point to call him an idiot. Gee, Tomate, don't take it so personal. The "sensitive" one is you.

    It wasn't the quote in the book that did it but your interpretation. I don't want people to think they should avoid one of the most ancient areas of Paris because there is much to see there, and ghetto, it's certainly not! Now if you do want ghetto, I can tell you exactly where to go. You may or may not come back out in one piece, though.

    And yeah, I don't think Rick Steeves is that special, sorry.

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  72. ms. tomato, regarding the -ing suffix, i get your drift - i more or less had the same impression.

    what i especially find amusing is the retail stores in paris with english names, like SHOE SHOE and HAPPY PHOTO. they're pretty nonsensical to an english speaker, but they must make pretty music to french ears!

    barbara

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  73. oops, didn't realize you were tomate with an "e".

    now that i've publically humiliated myself, and revealed my true ignorance, i'll go quietly and die a thousand deaths ...

    :)

    just call me babs

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  74. Zip it Tomate! This the second instance that you've gone ON AND ON AND ON about some stupid issue....never ending! The last time, I realized that you were never going to shut up until I just ignored your repeated ramblings. This one will not last for days like the last time.

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