Sunday, November 04, 2007

L'Opéra de Paris


Anyone who's been to Paris also knows the facade of the old opera house, also known as Le Palais Garnier (after the architect who built it). Well, I chose to show you a particular angle of it; its entrance floor... Less spectacular, but more original! This stunning building was completed in 1874 and has been renewed several times since then (starting with electricity in 1969!!). I love it because it's the symbol of the magnificence of Paris during the 19th century. Since we're talking opera, here is a little extract of La Juive by Halevy, sung by my favorite Tenor: Roberto Alagna. La Juive was the opera that was given the day they inaugurated this opera house.

17 comments:

  1. Gorgeous Eric. Just up my street this is.. gold... mmm. Great angle you got there.

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  2. L'Opera Garnier is a lovely Beaux Arts building, inside and out. Approaching it, we gawk. Entering, we gasp. Walking within, we smile. We grin. We laugh. It's freakin' gorgeous. It glows gold. Go to the Musee d'Orsay, and there is a painting of the grand stairway. We have a photo of the second floor (oops, le premier etage) reception hall. Good job, Eric. This place rocks!

    What the hell am I doing on the computer at 1:15 a.m.?

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  3. Agree with your assessment Jeff...and your review of the Opera too! What ARE you doing up? Jetlag with the time change?

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  4. Hey Eric, I heard that Sarkozy just flew to Chad to meet the President there over the "kidnapping" scandal there. I didn't know that France was so close to Chad. Guess Sarko won't be going to the opera any time soon.

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  5. I would recommend the tour of the Opera Garnier to anyone, it is fantabulous! I have never seen an opera there, but should seriously think about filling that gap in my life very soon.

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  6. We saw La Bayadère (which is a ballet, not an opera) at le Palais Garnier for my music class. It was exciting to be there, but our seats were uncomfortable. I'm really short and even *I* had no leg room. But it was still great to be there and a great experience once my legs stopped hurting. :) We also saw La Traviata while I was there but it was in a different theatre.

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  7. Bonjour Eric

    Visiteur régulier mais pas commentateur (juste 2, 3 fois il y a 2 ans...) je vous ai mis en lien sur mon propre blog.
    J'admire autant la régularité métronomique de vos billets que la qualité toujours renouvellée de vos photos.
    C'est en regardant vos clichés que je comprends la différence entre le pro et l'amateur.
    D'un même "objet" l'artiste donnera une vision nouvelle et extraite du réel pour lui attribuer une existence singulière et originale alors que l'amateur ne fera que reproduire ce qu'il voit du réel :-(

    Pour ce qui concerne l'électricité et la date de 1969, ne s'agit-il pas du passage du 110 volts au 220 plutôt? J'ai du mal à imaginer l'Opera Garnier sans electricité jusqu'au départ du Général de Gaulle (une référence comme une qutre...)

    Bien à vous

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  8. There is also a model of the Opera at the Musee d'Orsay where one has a cross section view of the Opera Garnier. It is fascinating!!

    Hope you are enjoying Le Camembert et Calvados in Normandie Eric!! The youtube link to the French lesson the other day was very funny...Oh la la! She also does one in Chinese...oh la la...quite diverse ehhh??? ;-)

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  9. Thanks for a view from the inside, Eric - I have only admired it from the outside (until now :-) ).

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  10. Flocon, en fait je pense qu'il s'agit de l'électrification de la scène (du mécanisme), pas de l'éclairage !

    Mais effectivement ma formulation laissait planer le doute !

    Et merci pour vos gentils mots en tout cas.

    Tonton, I had Livaro and fruits de mer. Good but filling! Now I have to go on a diet for a week!!

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  11. Eric, I love this building, particularly the foyer with its melange of marble and majestic staircase. I had a fantastic breakup there, our voices echoing throughout the voluminous space as Le Marriage de Figaro had just begun (we were late).

    A good friend of mine was also, for a while, the chef d'orchestre at Garnier and I spent a good amount of time trying to find him through the vast tunnels just below the stage.

    Well done!

    Matthew Rose / Paris

    http://lalandedigitalpress.blogspot.com/

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  12. Oh, I have a whole collection of photos of floors in Paris - from the Opera to Shakespeare & Co. They are among my favorite photos. I just marvel at the patience and talent of those who laid the beautiful mosaics that so many people never notice. I also loved the little dragon on the outside of the grand staircase - all of Paris is full of little surprises if you just look closely.

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  13. The Opera Garnier is my favorite building in Paris. I have never been inside except for the little ballet museum. Is that still there?

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  14. I asked my wife to marry me here. One of the most magical nights of my life.

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  15. ah...Roberto Alagna. I felt so sorry for him when he was booed off at La Scala. Those Italians! :)

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