Thursday, December 04, 2008

African Baby


How cute is that? I took this photo in the Strasbourg Saint-Denis area (10th arrondissement), one of the several "little Africas" there are in Paris and its surroundings. According to very old stats that I found on the web there are approximately 80 000 Africans (from black Africa only) in Paris. A lot of them come from former French colonies where they used to - and still - speak French.

57 comments:

  1. hee tee that's so precious :)
    Underneath her sweater it looks like she's got a hula skirt on.
    great shot as always!

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  2. I am curious as to what the baby is looking at. So much color must be a feast for the eyes even of one so small.

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  3. Eric, that is SO cute. I love the way you can see the form of the little one's plump little leg wrapped around mum's back.

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  4. I also wonder what's got the baby's attention so intently? Little ones can be so cute,but also very annoying.

    I hate going to restaurants and hearing a screaming baby near.Epecially if I'm at a nice restauarant.I'm sorry but I don't want to hear your kid screaming it's head off.
    I like this shot though.I like that she's in fairly dark colors and the only bit of color is her pink shirt?

    Everything else around her has pops of color.

    and I'm GF!! GF!!
    AND I like the title of the photo too:)

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  5. It looks like mommy's wearing something lacy on her head. Paris chic!

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  6. I always admire african mothers who can raise so many children... In a certain way, all mothers carry their children on their back during a pretty long time even when they are too heavy to be carried like that ;) Wonderful photo as usual!

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  7. Really cute. Must develop very stretched muscles if his little legs are that wide open around Mum though! Lovely shot, Eric.

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  8. Great photo, Eric.

    I love the melting-pot cities of the world. I saw a number of African-garbed women but wasn't able to discreetly get a photo of any of them. This little one is definitely really cute - they are for some reason more intense and not as cute when they're only minutes or hours old. Maybe its the ordeal they've just been through.

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  9. Love this shot! :)
    Hard to get a clear shot of someone in movement, but glad you got it anyway!

    The proportion of foreign people and/or people speaking foreign languages in the streets of Paris seem to have increased a great deal in the past 20 years, no? Just my impression.

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  10. I love a momma that carries her baby in a wrap or sling. So much more loving than strapping them into an infant carrier where they get no human touch.

    Lynn, when moms carry their babies like that, it promotes proper development of the baby's hips. :)

    Great photo Eric

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  11. Glad to hear it, Sherry. I loved the closeness of the sling too, with my babies, but their legs hung downwards and they were at the front. This babe looks comfy anyway.

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  12. I am officially jealous of this baby. Not for being able to ride mama's back, but because he gets to raised in Paris!

    Wonderful photo, Eric. Culture shots are always very intriguing. I wonder how she gets the baby on her back in just the right spot without dropping him.

    Pssst...Michael...look at those CHEEKS! So pinch-able.

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  13. It must be wonderful to be raised in Paris!! Eiffel Tower Suzy... If you don't mind where are you from??

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  14. Eric you are so amazing, always finding so many creative matters to your posts.
    This is a cute photo indeed. It's fantastic how interesting sights come your way.

    The african community is very large in Paris, and it's probably growing, non?

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  15. This photo also brings to mind an observation I made in Paris which I'm not sure is correct. I'd love to know what others think.

    It seemed to me that French dads are more comfortable with public shows of affection to their children of all ages, particularly their sons, than American dads are. They seemed to be doing more child care and be more openly tender with their kids.

    Am I seeing things?!!

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  16. I like how you focused on just these two, and let the background fuzz a bit.

    The February theme poll is open for CDP bloggers (if you can get the site to load!).

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  17. What a cutie patootie!! That baby has the most pinchable cheeks ever. How adorable. I do miss the time when my kids were small enough to fit into their baby carriers and they would snuggle close to mom. Thankfully, they still do like to snuggle next to mom...

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  18. Nicely captured, Eric—this baby looks both curious and content.
    cristy -- are you adding swishy fringe like this mom's to the crown?
    I have fond memories of carrying my kids around like this—only in front. I did it until Katie was so big that I actually fell forward. She never touched the ground, but I totalled my knees and elbows protecting her!

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  19. Great shoto and glad it's good for the baby and not dislocating those tiny hips!
    V

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  20. I'm with you Monica, Eric definitely has a talented knack for catching amazing shots. Love this, Well done dear Eric!

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  21. A fantastic shot Eric. I also like the other beautiful dresses the African women wear here and have always wanted to tell them so on the Metro if I thought I wouldn't be perceived as rude.

    Carrie, you are so right. Without stereotyping, dads in Paris (in France?) are very affectionate toward their children, including the boys. Also, when you meet someone's children (up to a certain age) you tend to give them one or two kisses versus shaking their little hand.

    I also noticed that when small children go on field trips away from school and they have to hold hands with a friend to stick together, there is not problem for two boys to be put together. I love this the most about children. No social assumptions or restrictions on their creativity until "the adults" get involved.

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  22. Hey, now that's not a bad way to see Paris! The little guy is probably looking for some sales on jazz cds...Coltrane or Miles. Because you know it's never too early to get the little ones hooked on great music. ;-) Merci Eric.
    Cristy...tired of the "screaming baby" at restaurants? All the more reason to get them "singing." lol

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  23. Great solution Coltrane...at home...

    ;-)

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  24. Hi Eric!!

    Have been meaning to write you, yet there is never enough time!

    First of all, did you know that there was a photo of you and the blog + twitter in Le Monde about 2 weeks ago... ? (you probably knew...)

    And second of all, this is funny for me your photo today because yesterday I was about 50 meters from a woman who also had her baby on her back, as this woman did, BUT... I litterally ran to her aid becasue the baby, no more than 1 year was dangling and about to hit the pavement! Needless to say (does that sound mean?), the woman was a French bobo... I didn't dare tell her that she should take a lesson from an African woman! The African women I know swear that is soooo easy to strap up their little one; and i have seen it, but could never reproduce that. I think that it is so ingrained in the culture that it becomes second nature... Not so for the white woman who tries ! I guess this is why we have the Baby Bjorn! LOL

    As always, Eric, the blog is wonderful!

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  25. Wow Elizabeth, Eric didn't tell us he was in Le Monde! More, Eric please!

    That sounds alarming, about the baby nearly dropping. This is one reason I always had the babies at the front, where I could see them.

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  26. Hello Everybody. I have been seeing the blog and it is just amazing. I would like to share this link with you, for you to watch a presentation about Parisian Architecture.

    http://ppts-interesantes.blogspot.com/2008/12/arquitectura-parisina.html

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  27. This is a neat photo. I watched a lot of television while in the hospital and noticed most of the photos of people were of them going away from the cameras. I know about the privacy thing but what happened to the good old days when people mugged around for the camera?

    I hope you still got all that money from that sale on E-Bay.



    I am getting a little stronger. I am getting a nurse today and hopefully she can remove the tape that is driving me nuts and then the two or three stitches they left after they had cut the hole too large into my chest cavity under my left arm. The tape now bothers me more than the stitches.

    TALC is the only thing I heard while in the hospital for 7 full days that caused even the old nurses to wince. It is a caustic stuff not like the name implies that makes things raw and that then will, hopefully, become scar tissue that prevents leaks and blowing out of the lung in the future.

    It hurts and it takes all day for the hurt to ease. I had lots of morphine shots.

    I lost the desire for coffee and have had none for about 10 days. I did drink and am allowed to drink decaf coffee but I don't really like it.

    I am on a no salt or low salt diet and am still trying to get used to it. Even a dab of salt makes things taste better than no salt.

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  28. Poor Abraham. I do wish you better and am so glad you are out of hospital now. Let's hope Nurse can take that tape off and make you comfortable.

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  29. I was thinking the same, Abraham, about the pics from behind. I tend to do it myself, too, for fear of the alarm which some people feel when having their photo taken! I personally wouldn't mind at all, apart from vanity; thinking I might look awful at the time. I really don't get it. I do understand the stop on child photography in the street, but other than that, why the big objection? Why are we all forced to feel like we're brandishing a gun instead of a simple camera?

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  30. I must give credit where credit's due: I'd forgotten Eric's post on the Societe Generale Bank when I was told to see it. You can see the pix on September 22nd! I think my next trip should be Paris PDP spots - good for another month at least!

    Eric -- Le Monde??!! Awesome! Whats up??!!

    I hadn't known until PDP about the whole don't take my photo thing. I was hesitant to take photos with people facing me, but I had a couple good results. I was in the metro one day and there was an ad I wanted to shoot on the other side of the tracks. A guy was in front of it on his cell phone, but looking my way. I put my camera up, then moved my face aside and looked at him, so he could turn away if he wanted to -- instead he just started grinning and kept talking -- I guess he thought I wanted to photo him! So, he's in the shot! After that, when I wanted to take a photo with a person looking my way, I just started grinning and waving at them - not exactly candid photos, but nobody growled - everyone smiled or waved back!

    Michael -- thanks for the reply. Its so clear how the comfort level passes from generation to generation - its too bad American boys don't get that experience and permission as much.

    Abraham -- I hope you'll mend soon - sounds like no fun whatsoever.

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  31. Oh hey - bet a couple of you will relate to this - I watched An American In Paris for the first time last night. Nothing better than Gene Kelly, Leslie Caron, and the Eiffel Tower!!! Sweet film. : )

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  32. Great capture of a "typical" sidewalk scene in the area. For a minute there, I thought I was in a different country!

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  33. Ohhh I haven't seen An American in Paris - at least not all the way through. I must.
    Like you Carrie I was recently taking a photo of an event and some arrogant and aggressive people demanded if I was taking their photo. I wasn't! I'd really like to know what the objection is.

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  34. I thought that some of you might be interested to see how to tie a Kanga (Kikoy). This could become a western fashion after this video!

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  35. That's really really cute.
    Eric did you see how she put her baby on her back? That's just amazing, I saw a mum doing that, once, and was so frightened that her child fall! But no. She did it with ease and grace. Of course.

    Want to SHOUT a little bit: what happened in California!!
    Just read in Le Monde (but didn't see Eric yet) that PROP 8 was adopted by the people!! Six months ago we were happy to celebrate the fact that gay people were allowed to marry, today I'm indignant that a referendum has been decided by the opponents and approved! A wedding is an union between a man and a woman. Isn't cheesy?
    Arizona and Florida did the same...It's a bad day.

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  36. We're not out of the woods, yet, Guille. A hangover lasts for a while. We just need to get through it until the head and vision regain clear focus. That's when we'll say: oh my god, did we actually do that? Then we'll need to clean up our mess.

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  37. I wish I could explain it to you, Guille, but I don't understand either. I'm sure we'll get to vote on it again. These things go back and forth so much I'm getting dizzy.

    Christy, I am in the Bay Area of California, but I was born and raised in southern New England. But my heart...well...you know where it resides.

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  38. ...And "cheesy" is too good a word. I would say it's more "Velveety". (By the way, did you try that crap yet?)

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  39. Abraham -- keep on the mend—and if you no longer crave coffee, so much the better. Caffeine is no good for you, anyway, and there are plenty of other things you can order and linger over in Parisian cafes!

    Carrie -- I envy you your first look at An American in Paris. I keep it on my iPod (along with Funny Face, the movie that made me want to live in Paris).

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  40. oh this reminds of me and my baby. in mexico, we have a wrap that is called a "reboso" and it is the most comfortable way to carry a baby, you can carry them on your back, in the front and on your side. i was fortunate enough to have the one my mother carried me in...and i got to carry my son.

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  41. Ok I'm completely lost - or completely innocent, I don't know which - what has happened in Cali and what's Prop 8? I feel out of the loop...:(

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  42. I thought 10th arrondissement is indian quarter

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  43. Alexa -- Yes I will be adding some pink swishy things to my crown + a very chic Parisian hat..

    Coltrane -- Yup so true! I mean I don't mind them really.It's just that screaming and running around that annoys me.Maybe next time ;)

    Eiffel Tower Suzy -- Thanks,I just assume from your name your lived in France.Silly me, I've actually been to the bay area of California.Me and my husband went there for our honeymoon and we loved it:) The weather was fantastic..Nothing like southern weather..humid,sticky,and HOT!!!

    and I completely understand about your heart being in Paris!! Me and my mom went last summer and ahhhhh words cannot describe it.It was absolutly love and romantic.

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  44. > Tomate "The proportion of foreign people and/or people speaking foreign languages in the streets of Paris seem to have increased a great deal in the past 20 years, no?" Hum; it's hard to tell really.

    > Monica "The african community is very large in Paris, and it's probably growing, non?" I should think so, yes. But it's hard to know.

    > Elizabeth "First of all, did you know that there was a photo of you and the blog + twitter in Le Monde about 2 weeks ago... ? (you probably knew...)" Yes, I know, amazing the number of people who noticed it (and thogh it was a tiny photo !)

    > Abraham. Sorry to hear you were in the hospital again and had to experience all these terrible things. I'm glad you're feeling better now - Don't drive the nurse cazy ;))

    > Michael, thank you, your link to "how to tie a Kanga, is great!

    > Guille. "Eric did you see how she put her baby on her back?" No, I did not this time, but I saw a mother do it some other time. It's cute and pretty shaky for the baby...

    > Lisa "I thought 10th arrondissement is indian quarter" Yes true also... But one part of it only.

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  45. Christy, you aren't the first one to think I live in Paris! I'm not sure why. I haven't even been in any of the PDP gathering photos!

    Abraham Lincoln, please feel better soon! I hope to see your name more often in PDP.

    Eric, you are so darn cute that I bet millions of Parisian women cut your photo out of the newspaper and tucked it discreetly into their wallets for future admiration.

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  46. ET Suzy :"I haven't even been in any of the PDP gathering photos!" Really ???...!!

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  47. I love how this photo shows that there is quite a diverse population in CDG. This area is the only place i was able to find a salon that did acrylic nails in CDG for a good price. I think this is more info than you needed to know.

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  48. Anonyme - really!

    phx-cdg - too much info about Paris? Jamais!

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  49. My sister got herself a cloth sling from Guatemala — really just a strip of cloth like this with rings. You can choose where to position the baby, and they were amazingly secure as long as you position the cloth right.

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  50. Eric, just wanted you to know that I am a loyal reader/viewer, and you got a little link love on my blog today: http://tinyurl.com/linklove124

    Ciao!
    Angela

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  51. My first visit, thanks to Angela's link. I'll a regular, especially since I'm coming to Paris soon to photograph. Merci, Eric!

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