Tuesday, May 05, 2009

Mozart lived there


I love it when I walk down a street in Paris and suddenly see a plaque on the wall saying "This writer/singer/composer... lived in this building in XXXX". The latest one I saw - and obviously photographed - was the one of Mozart who came to Paris for the first time in 1763 with his father (he was 7 at the time). It's located in the Hotel de Beauvais a magnificent building that was completed in 1656 and that you absolutely have to see if you happen to pass by the 68 rue Francois Miron in the 4th arrondissement. PS: don't forget next week's picnic!

38 comments:

  1. Oh yes I love it too - we have Elgar in nearby Worcester and it's such a thrill. This is a lovely plaque Eric. Am I GF? :D

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  2. Seeing a sign like this has a way of making one feel part of something bigger. I appreciate these signs, too.

    Congrats, Lynn! :)

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  3. I love it, too!

    Last time we were in Paris we stayed at the Hotel Marsollier Opera, where it is told that Oscar Wilde lived for a time. It made living in the teeny-tiny itsy-bitsy hotel room a bit more exciting.

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  4. Thanks Parisian Heart! Hope you enjoyed the music.

    How exciting Suzy! Adore Oscar Wilde.

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  5. Oh! I'm learning something again on PDP.

    I walked by this place numerous times during my trip last fall and didn't realize he'd lived here. Its so cool to walk thru time in Paris. I feel like the ghosts of all these famous people, as well as the millions of regular folks, are walking along side me.

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  6. These finds are just some of the many gems awaiting one around the next corner in Paris. Bravo Maestro Tenin!

    Lynn...way to go!!!!!!!

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  7. Rue Francois Miron is one of the great streets of Paris. It has everything including a medieval timbered house, and Israel, a store selling great oils and condiments.

    During Fete de la Musique, I found myself on that street , with throngs of other people,following a band like the pied piper. Didn't hurt that there was wine involved.

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  8. Thanks Coltrane! I hear that drum roll!

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  9. Lynn -- thanks for the lovely link, our GF!
    Learning something from pretty much everyone tonight. Thanks, all!
    Suzy -- I had a good friend who lived at the hotel that became L'Hotel (after a very expensive renovation). We had some GOOD times there.
    If you pay attention when you're walking around Paris (as Eric does), look at what you can discover!

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  10. An acquaintance stayed at L’Hotel but he didn’t like the image on the screen of the computer in his room. His last words before leaving were, “Either that wallpaper goes, or I do.”

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  11. Would love to see this plaque in person... and the rest of Paris of course!

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  12. A lovely close-up, Eric, and you chose his best side... how flattering of you! It's possible young Mozart wrote all or part of his first Violin Sonata there. At that age, I'd have been out patting Parisian puppy dogs or getting a tummy ache from eating too many pastries.

    Lynn, congrats GF and a note-worthy crown.

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  13. Alright, somebody please explain the French grammar on the plaque.

    If 'Mozart lived in this house' translates into 'Mozart habita dans cette maison', then what does 'Mozart a habité dans cette maison' mean? --Mozart has lived in this house?

    I've checked verb conjugators and it says 'habita' is the indicative past of 'habiter'. I don't seem to use this tense very often back in French class...

    Then again, shouldn't 'Mozart ONCE lived in this house' be more accurate?

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  14. photolicious -- I'm sure this could be better explained by Eric, or Guille, or Thib, for example, but let me try. This is the passé simple, which has largely disappeared from written French, but can still be found if you read, for example, Le Petit Prince, or plaques on Paris buildings.

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  15. Photolicious I had the same doubt as you.
    I thought it would be more common to see written on a plaque like this
    "Mozart a vécu dans cette maison"

    I saw some plaques like this in Paris.


    Either way, it's like Coltrane said, one of Paris many gems!

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  16. Specially for Phx(Lynn):

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEAR LYNNNNNNN
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!!!!!!!!

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  17. HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWEET LYNN.

    Oh, Eric I did not know Mozart was in Paris. This is so interesting. I just adore Mozart. Also, I love it when you talk history to us. ;^) I too read these plaques on the wall where ever I am. Not only in Paris, anywhere. I just find it interesting.

    I am looking forward to the picnic. This is going to be such fun!

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  18. thanks for the music link Lynn & congrats to you as well!
    I love Mozart Eric & I love his little portrait too.

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  19. Curious... The French tell us someone famous lived here. The Americans would tell us someone (most likely Geo. Washington) slept here.

    I like this sign. I can actually translate it. But shouldn't Mozart be a child in the profile? He was 7 years old when he lived there.

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  20. Oh so it's your birthday USA Lynn (Phx)? Happy Birthday!!!

    I think, Photolicious, that this is old French but yes we need the Frenchies here to instruct us further. Calling Eric, Guille, Thib please! I'm sure Michael could explain too. He is now an official Frenchie.

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  21. Monsieur, I just love your blog! I think every American artist has secret Paris envy and wants to be French on some level, and I am no different. I love your city, whether it is sunny or gray, and your lovely blog reminds me of good times walking down her streets and is full of exciting hints on where I should go on my next visit.

    Merci beaucoup!

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  22. Mozart is the man, and knowing about this gorgeous building is yet another reason that Paris is the city. It's a beautiful shot and I'm imagining I'm right there reading the plaque in person.

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  23. > Photolicious and Alexa. You're right Passé Composé is nowadays more used than Passé Simple, mainly for facility reasons. The latter is still written though. An easy difference among them could be that using the Passé Composé indicates that the action lasts in the Présent, which is not the case with the Passé Simple : "Quand je suis venu à Paris…" (I'm still in Paris when I say this) // "Quand je vins à Paris…" (I'm not in Paris anymore).

    I hope this helped a little.

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  24. Another intersting (at least to me !) information about the Hôtel de Beauvais : this building was bought to a jewish family by the Ville de Paris through its policy of spoliation of the jewish goods during the Occupation.

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  25. Lois. "I am looking forward to the picnic. This is going to be such fun!" So am I Lois.

    So far the weather looks good, but it's too early to tell for sure. I'll keep you updated.

    Lynn... - Sorry PHX - joyeux anniversaire ;-) We'll put candles on a cracker for you at the picnic!

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  26. WOW ,I just got a big surprise just now with your birthday wishes from around the world!! This was exciting!!! Now I know how Eric feels....and it's really nice!!!

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  27. Happy Birthday Lynn-PHX-CDG!!!!
    I hope you have an excellent Celebration!
    Enjoyevouz!!! ;)

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  28. Lovely pictures. We will be staying in the 4th not far from Hotel de Beauvais and I can't wait to check it out. Thanks Eric

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  29. Happy Birthday, Phx.

    I always seem to find the plaques marking where someone died! LOL.

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  30. PHX-CDG Lynn: After it’s made into French fries I wonder who’s gonna eat the crack. This is just a foretaste of your flaming Ritz.

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  31. I love historical markers such as this one. They remind me that I'm standing on ground where the great have stood, walking where they've walked.

    Happy birthday, PHX!

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  32. Lynn, congrats GF! And I love your musical crown...

    Alexa and Nasty GG, you gave perfect explanations of the difference between passé simple and passé composé.
    Nasty GG gave the correct grammar rule... however, we do not necessary follow it in "usual" french (shame on us...) and we often use passé composé even when the action is finished.

    The weather forecast I have for Wednesday next week is "cloudy, with temp. between 9° to 20°C" (to be confirmed!).
    Don't forget your jumpers or sweaters ;-)

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