Tuesday, September 20, 2005

La taverne du Sergent Recruteur


If you’re looking for a typical meal experience while you’re in Paris, I recommend you pay a visit to this “tavern” which is located in the middle of Isle St. Louis (more precisely 41 rue St-Louis-en-l'Isle). Don’t expect fancy cuisine or anything but just a “different” atmosphere supposedly inherited from the Gaulois era (the first inhabitants of France) – meaning wine, solid food, large quantities… The name of the place (the recruiter’s sergeant tavern) is said to come from a time where young men were taken to the place for wine and women and would awake the next day to find themselves signed up for the French army… Nothing of that kind nowadays, as far as I know!

13 comments:

  1. Funny, I didn't know this place. Depending on the soldier's puppet, it seems that the recruiter was working during Napoleon 1st reign. Is that correct ?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Another place for me to visit next time I am in Paris! Thanks, Eric!

    ReplyDelete
  3. wine and women ?
    for sure i would never have made it to the french army...

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is one of the first places I was taken when I first transfered to France. It's a great atmosphere (even if a bit touristy), where they have sausage and onions, pickles and peppers, big loaves of bread and cheap wine (if I remember well?!) all on the table for everybody to dive into. A super place to be with a group of people.

    It also here that I learned my first French curse words, so the memory is strong. (come to think of it, yes, it must have been cheap wine!)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Large quantities of solid food sounds good! :)

    They used to do something like this to get men into the British Navy. Groups of recruiters, called Press Gangs, would get men drunk in taverns and "press" them into service. In other words, when they woke up they'd already be on the high seas. My mother tells me this happened to her grandfather three times. I guess he liked his ale. :)

    Et merci beaucoup for the link.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I used to walk past that restaurant all the time but thought it was a bit of a novelty! A few doors up (or down) is a wonderful small French/Italian restaurant. They used to have 10E lunches and not that much more for dinner. I really hope it is still there. Do you buy any chance know the name Eric?

    ReplyDelete
  7. > Isido, yes probably Napoleon. But you probably know more than I do!

    > Elisabeth. Do you seriously think you'll have enough time to visit all these places?!

    > Mornin' Tomate. thanx for checking!

    > Charlus LOL. Look at Pam's comment, she mentions Press gang, that might have interested you...

    > Michael. What was this curse word?!

    > Pam, yeah well, I think what you describe is exactly what they used to do in France too.

    > Julia. Non I don't but I surely will inquire!

    ReplyDelete
  8. That would be lovely if you could! Merci en avance. The maitre was as delightful as the food so I hope it is still there and the same quality.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The tavern has been there forever--my first visit was in the mid 1960s as a kid. Went back in the 1980s and nothing had changed--glad to know its still the same! There's another great restaurant about a block east (past the bridge) on the north side of the Seine. Bon appetit! Jim

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is very interesting site... » » »

    ReplyDelete