Saturday, May 06, 2006

Hotel Lutetia


Built in 1910, the Hotel Lutetia may not be the most luxurious hotel in Paris but it is definitely a classic. First of all, it's the only one of this "standing" located on the Left Bank. Secondly, it was the first Art Deco building in Paris. Thirdly, it has a long and interesting history...it was the Gestapo headquarters during WW II and then became the place where the camp refugees were put in transit while the authorities were looking for their families right after the war. And maybe the most interesting of all, it is also the hotel where General De Gaulle spent his honeymoon!

23 comments:

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  2. Oh, I love the Lutetia, and enjoyed every time I walked past on the way to the Luxembourg or Bon Marché or La Pagode, but I'm pretty sure that 1910 is a little early for Art Deco. I'm even more sure that this building shares many of the traits of the substantial, restrained Art Nouveau buildings in the Seventh--there's some vivid floral ornamentation that seems out of place for Art Deco but fits into the Art Nouveau pretty well. I also know that the current management calls the describes the hotel as "the first art deco hotel" but, really, I think they're wrong. Nice photo, though, and nice to see the tricolor up there, too.

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  3. Oh how beautiful! I hope some day I have the money to stay there...or anywhere nice in Paris for that matter!

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  4. One of my favourites spots. Haven't been for years but remember it well. That is viewed, I have neer stayed there.

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  5. Great pic and info! Eric, well done!

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  6. I love this building and the way it majestically stands over the Bon Marché and little square just in front. I also was interested to learn about De Gaulle's honeymoon being spent there as I hadn't heard that one before. Do you suppose they let out that room for a premium ?

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  7. Great photo Eric. Wasn't "Lutetia" the original name for Paris also?

    I read your blog every day but do not always comment. Please keep going...I learn so much. - Sandrine

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  8. Hi Eric, I pop in to your blog everyday, I don't often leave a comment as I think everyone says it all. But, it was your blog that inspired many of us to join the crazy world of the DP.Keep up the great work.
    PS. By the way I lived at 15 avenue Mozart in the early 90's and often cycled around the 16th, can you believe it I didn't have a camera back then.

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  9. A lire de toute urgence pour tous ceux qui aiment le Lutetia ou sont tout simplement intrigués par son histoire "Lutetia "de Pierre Assouline, editions Gallimard NRF. J'ai habité 6 ans à quelques numéros de ce célèbre hôtel et à l'époque je le détestais pour son histoire pendant la guerre, après la lecture de ce livre je me suis mise à l'aimer...
    Hi Mark, I lived during 20 years rue Jasmin (métro jasmin)...
    thanks a lot for this beatiful site Eric !

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  10. This building looks like it would have been luxurious in its time. Glad to see it hasn't been pulled down and replaced with something modern.
    Thanks for the info- I am learning lots about Paris!

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  11. And just round the corner to the left is one of my wifes (read me) favorites stop offs. La Maison du Chocolat!!

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  12. i did an interview with a filmmaker in that very hotel!

    read here

    http://tenminutesolder.blogspot.com/2005/08/several-weeks-ago-i-made-trip-to-paris.html

    npw i'm living not far away from paris!

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  13. Thanks for that interesting info on the Hotel Lutetia - I live five minutes from there and have often remarked on it and felt it was something special - now I know why!

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  14. Really nice picture, and even more interesting history lesson.
    Thanks a lot!

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  15. I got the link from manila daily photos..really nice picture and informative too...

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  16. Great photo and knowing more about the subject makes it even better. Thank you!

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  17. Lily - I read that book last summer, a quick a rather entertaining read. It's definitely a beautiful building with a very rich history. Spare me the idea of what Le Grand Charles and Tante Yvonne did in that room...

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  18. It's definitely an interesting building. I'd love to see what it looks like on the inside.

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  19. Eric, I seem to recall you mentioning the macarons at La Maison du Chocolat...hope you stopped in for one (or a few) while you were in the neighborhood!

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  20. Yes, Lutetia was the name for the High Empire settlement at Paris. This is the first great big hotel de luxe on the Left Bank, which is the side of Paris on which Lutetia sat. No where near where the hotel is, though. It's further west than the furthest extents of Lutetia.

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  21. Just love your photo's of Paris, already loving your city the extra insight is just marvellous and will make us even more aware on our next visit.

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  22. The book "One Thousand Buildings of Paris" has it written that the building is a combination of Art Nouveau and early Art Deco. But then it goes on to say that Hotel Lutetia provided a setting for the 1974 Louis Malle film "Damage." This Jeremy Irons and Juliette Binoche vehicle was released in 1992 so one wonders how far one can go in believing anything that is written in this book.

    I see. There was also a 1974 film titled "Damage." It just happens to be 12 minutes long and sans Louis Malle, Jeremy Irons, and Juliette Binoche. Sloppy research.

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