Thursday, October 26, 2006

Autumn in Paris


The weather is still pretty mild in Paris at the moment but autumn has already started, as you obviously can see from the amount of leaves on the ground. It's a period I like very much because it gives this special color to all gardens and parks throughout the city. BTW several people asked me yesterday if I used a tripod to take my pics at night. I don't, because it's not easy to carry; I use anything I can find to remain stable. The ground, yesterday to take the gargoyle or a public bench to take this photo!

52 comments:

  1. j'aime le point de vue de cette photo....

    nice talking to you again, Eric! a bientot a paris!

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  2. Yes, merci Skype! A bientôt Nanajoon

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  3. Now that's pretty!!! Good shot! Looks like a painting!

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  4. Eric, I love the fall and you have captured it! Thanks.

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  5. If it doesn't get colder it would be fine with me. This is a nice park in Paris at night, but not sure I like walking through it at night. Not that Paris isn't safe, but it's just eerie.

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  6. Hey, did anybody see this article 'Paris Syndrome' leaves tourists in shock - Japanese visitors found to suffer from psychiatric phenomenon on MSNBC?

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  7. Yes, Michael, many people (who have never been to Paris and know of my love for her) sent me the article. They were expecting an answer/defense, but I said nothing. It *was* an amusing article, though.

    Autumn is wonderful in Philadelphia at this time, Eric. It is my favorite season. I love photographing the fallen leaves, but had not done so at night. So tomorrow night.....

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  8. Me again. I remember the song we were taught and sang in high school and every year since: "Mais la vie separe ce qui s'aime, tous doucement sans faire de brie. Et la mer efface sur la sable les pas des amants desunis". Sigh. So very beautiful "

    Hope I haven't butchered the spelling too much. I sing it and sing it, but have never looked at the written lyrics in many years.

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  9. So the old man of two days ago left the bench apparently ;-)

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  10. Ujima : "Faut pas en faire tout un fromage" ! LOL. I know it is not very nice making fun a mis-spelling (lots of them in my English of course) but I loved your "Mais la vie separe ce qui s'aime, tous doucement sans faire de brie". You meant "bruit" (> noise) whereas "brie" is a large kind of "camembert" (to put it shortly) and "faire un fromage" about something means more or less making a scandal of it !
    Sorry !!! ;o)) and thank you for a large morning smile !

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  11. Thanks for that Eric, I enjoyed the shot , in articular the lovely angle across the bench!

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  12. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  13. sorry for deleting my post, a little mistake there.

    Congratulations on the new CDPB portal, and thanks too. Great job!

    So its "aki " autumn in paris too. Starting to get cold here,brrr!
    that picture really has that aki feeling.

    anyway Michael (didnt leave his url ) directed me to a disturbing news concerning paris. He is also wondering what you will say about this matter.

    sleep well tonight!

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  14. I saw a beautiful slideshow of Paris from the lead on Michael's link. None of the photos would save. Quelle domage pour moi!
    I save most of your photos and I find this one hautingly lovely.

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  15. "Les Feuilles Mortes?" There is a sense of the song here...no people...the controlled palette and the line of lamps are beautiful.

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  16. Nice, warm autumn picture. I like the colors.

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  17. Typo above: hauntingly
    Johnny Mercer wrote words in English for the song mentioned above. "Autumn Leaves". My favorite version of the song is in French with Juliette Greco singing it. Both the song and this photo are hauntingly beautiful.

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  18. Thanks.
    I love Paris in autumn... also at spring...
    I live near you in Paris-Montmartre.

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  19. Thank you, gg, for the "heads" up on my "cheesy" spelling. 8>D
    I'm on my way out to my volunteer day to teach a computer lesson. Maybe I'll do freetranslations.com today. LOL

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  20. I don't like this time of the year
    its so wet and gray.
    ?

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  21. Bonjour Eric:

    The receding bench seat brings a dynamic perspective to this photo that would not be there if you had not used a tripod and set it up in the park proper at eye level.

    Another very nice benefit of placing the camera on the bench seat it the nice iron work supporting the bench back.

    au revoir

    Steve in overcast chilly Chicago where the leaves are changing as well

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  22. I like the perspective of this photo.

    Michael,

    Yes, I read that the other day. A little extreme! lol! But I have to admit, I witnessed some of the unfriendliness as well while in Paris. Thank goodness for Eric! He has redeemed them all!

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  23. I can feel the crispness in the air! I wish I was there right now to experience all that is Paris in the fall!

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  24. Great Shot! The air is getting crisp here in Southern California but lately we've been having days in the high 80's.

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  25. If i had to bet, i would say this pic was taken in the "Invalides" area.
    How much did i win? :-)

    Ujima, what a nice song. And so true.

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  26. It is curious this "Paris syndrome" that happened to Japanese tourists.
    Paris is a nice city, but for sure not really friendly.
    Early this week i was in Switzerland, and i could see a group of Japanese tourists who were talking loudly and laughing while visiting Luzern.
    I can't remember having seen tourists feeling so confortable in the streets of Paris.

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  27. Paris is a nice city, but for sure not really friendly.

    Coudln't agree more. Although sometime, Parisians will suprise you with nice, selfless gestures of goodwill towards another ... (or perhaps these are people who work and live in Paris but come from some place else ;)

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  28. If I had to bet, I'd say this picture was taken at the bottom of the Champs Elysees, like the other one. :)

    (Oh, boy it feels good to be able to post on this blog again! Yeah, hurray Blogger!!)

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  29. wow i just checked back and read that article that Michael directed us to....interesting.....

    it is a prime example of an extreme case of cultural shock i suppose because Japanese culture of respect and composure i suppose clashes greatly with that of the french.

    i personally have never encountered disagreeable people out of the ordinary few...but New York City I think is a cold place, so there are people everywhere like that.

    i think that a lot of the struggle comes from the language barrier...if a tourist comes to paris and does not speak a word of french, they will most likely be snubbed, true....is it seen as a gesture of disrespect of their culture do you think?

    in any case, an interesting topic to talk about...

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  30. Glad you enjoyed the article about Japanese tourists. A lesson to us all to be nice to be people.

    I'm guessing this photo was either taken at the same place as this one or maybe the little park next to Les Halles. Eric, do tell!

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  31. I can't believe what I'm reading!

    'Paris is a nice city, but for sure not really friendly.' ?!

    My family and I had the most wonderful time in Paris this past May. And do you know why? It was because the French people were so unbelievably friendly and kind to us. We are of Pakistani descent, with a few years of college French between my sister and I, and yet we encountered one after another friendly Parisian. They talked to us in English, tolerated our poor French, pulled out maps to help us find our way, and translated announcements on the metro so we wouldn't miss our stop. It was my sister, not I, who was excited to go to France, but I was completely bowled over by everyone there. We have traveled quite a bit and have been all over Asia, the Middle East, and parts of Europe and Africa, and (besides our homeland of Pakistan), we all agreed that the French were the most tourist friendly group we had met up to date. So here's to all the friendly, helpful, kind hearted Parisians out there! My family and I will always defend you!

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  32. I can't believe what I'm reading!

    'Paris is a nice city, but for sure not really friendly.' ?!

    My family and I had the most wonderful time in Paris this past May. And do you know why? It was because the French people were so unbelievably friendly and kind to us. We are of Pakistani descent, with a few years of college French between my sister and I, and yet we encountered one after another friendly Parisian. They talked to us in English, tolerated our poor French, pulled out maps to help us find our way, and translated announcements on the metro so we wouldn't miss our stop. It was my sister, not I, who was excited to go to France, but I was completely bowled over by everyone there. We have traveled quite a bit and have been all over Asia, the Middle East, and parts of Europe and Africa, and (besides our homeland of Pakistan), we all agreed that the French were the most tourist friendly group we had met up to date. So here's to all the friendly, helpful, kind hearted Parisians out there! My family and I will always defend you!

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  33. We encountered no rude people while in Paris. I think as long as you are respectful of another culture, and you try to communicate without having a chip on your shoulder you will be treated with respect. That was our experience anyway.

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  34. You guys were lucky. I am an extremely friendly person I am told (friendly greetings, smile a lot, always say "bon jour." "merci".... yet I encountered several very surly people. The people in the hotels are always friendly...also many people that work in cafes....usually, it is other people that can be rude and nasty (a bus driver was very mean to me even though I greated him in French, smiled, etc., several women (they are the worst it seems) were very rude (at a pharmacy, on the streets with mean looks, etc.). Fortunately, there was one very nice older man that walked me to my destination even though we could barely communicate!

    Regarding the women, I finally got fed up with the rude women and gave it back to one woman as she had done to me (she looked me up and down...right to my face as we stood two feet from each other! For the record, in case you are thinking they stared rudely b/c I am the typical "loud, sloppy dressed, overweight American," I am petite, thin blonde dressed conservatively nice. And since I was alone...I certainly wasn't loud.

    Not even in New York City have I encountered so many unfriendly people. Not to mention being followed by several creepy men! But that's another story.

    Don't get me wrong, I loved Paris and I did meet a few nice people there. But I have to be honest that most were not very friendly.

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  35. Love the lines of perspectives in this.

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