Thursday, December 21, 2006

Saint Jean Baptiste de La Salle church


I know I'm late in posting... Blogger would not let me do anything last night! Anyway, here is a photo of the Saint Jean-Baptiste de La Salle church in the 15th arrondissement. A church that I never noticed until recently when I got lost in the neighbourhood (70 rue Falguière)! I did a little research and Saint Jean Baptiste de La Salle and I found out that he "invented" classrooms. Before him (1651 - 1719) teachers would come to the pupil(s) home and the teaching would take place in Latin and not French!

29 comments:

  1. Have you considered switching to Blogger Beta? ;) (just kidding)
    If it makes you feel any better, I cannot access your blog 50% of the time either. Shame on me, but I never heard of that church before. Paris is so incredibly rich, I guess you could live there 40 years and still discover new things on a daily basis. Thanks for helping us do that while watching over your shoulder.

    And I also take this opportunity to wish everybody a very happy holiday seasons. Most people in the States will take off tomorrow or Friday for the Xmas/NYear break). I think many French people do too, take a whole week off between Xmas and NY? Anyway, y'all have fun now and enjoy your time off! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well thank you Eric for this tribute to "Les Frères des Ecoles Chrétiennes" ! I guess many of their pupils in Turkey, Lebanon and Syria (among others) will appreciate today's post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like the way you took the picture. And thanks for the link.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good info Eric. We have La Salle schools here in Barcelona. I didn't know about the importance of the name and who Jean Baptiste was. Thanks. Maybe blogger problems are due to the fact that they are out of beta version recently...for better or worse?

    ReplyDelete
  5. The size and simplicity of the church impresses me. Normally when we "foreigners" think of Paris we visualize Gothic structures. I like this very much and would love to see photos of the interior. Thanks too for the blog explaining about the man responsible for innovative teaching.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yeah, yeah, Eric, explain away, do. Doen't wash with us! We know you were partying late, but partying at a CHURCH! Well, this is a new departure, even for you, you in-vogue trendsetter you.

    This is a gorgeous pic, complete with fencing which, rightly or wrongly, gives the impression that only the chosen few may worship there. Black & white is a good choice and as always the history is stimulating.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Interesting that he invented classrooms — there was a perhaps still is a famous correspondence school in the U.S. named LaSalle.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks for the photo and the link - I mistakenly thought that Saint Thomas Aquinas was the patron saint of teachers...
    Hmmm, you come to this site for a little taste of Paris and you end up getting education;-)))
    Maybe we should canonize you as a patron saint of DoPers?

    ReplyDelete
  9. My most favorite uncle, Frere Michel Sauvage, who passed away in March 2003, was at one time the foremost scholar on Saint Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, the founder of the Freres des Ecoles Chretiennes. I own a copy of a book he wrote on him (which was originally his doctoral dissertation), but I am ashamed to admit that I never read it! My uncle used to joke that this book would put anyone to sleep.

    I had no idea that there was a Saint Jean-Baptiste de la Salle church in Paris!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I like the way you framed the photo. A silent night indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Glad to have you back Eric!

    I'm not familiar with him either. According to the wikipedia link you provided, it said that he created the first "teacher's college."

    But this is what caught my attention the most:

    Did you write "y'all" Tomate? LOL! For those that don't know, that is a Southern U.S. invention...a contraction for "you all." Something we southerners have been teased about for years by our northern brothers! But, as I mentioned to my northern cousin recently, "y'all" is spreading throughout the U.S. as I notice it a lot on TV and movies. He didn't believe me.

    By the way, the correct useage of Y'all is ALWAYS plural. It is NEVER used to refer to only one person, regardless of what Y'all says in wiki. If they want to know the correct useage of it, they only need to ask us southerners...afterll, it's our word.

    ReplyDelete
  12. There is a LaSalle University here in Philadelphia.
    The University was founded in 1863, a legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order he founded 300 years ago.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Ever since finding this site, I haven't been able to start my day properly without a little peek.

    For Susan in Hotlanta, you can add me to your list of people outside the south who use y'all. I am born and bred in the Pacific Northwest, but picked it up sometime in college and it stuck. It just makes me smile to say it.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Beautiful shot...almost mystical. And interesting info to go with it.
    Seems you're leaving on holiday soon...so Bon Voyage to you, Eric.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Informative post. I enjoyed the history.

    Seems like a very nice parish, judging from their website. Lots of activities.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Very intersting. I read your blog daily, but have never commented. I'm in Kansas City, MO. We also, have a La Salle school here. I never knew where the name came from.

    ReplyDelete
  17. On a slightly different note: I remember that there was also a LaSalle that explored North America. I googled and there is a county named after him in Illinois....which also looks to be a French name (the "ois" part). Does anyone know if it is?

    Just another example of how people from all over the world (but primarily Western Europe) are a huge part of the making of "America." You guys are all part of us in some ways!

    ReplyDelete
  18. "the man responsible for innovative teaching."

    Responsible AND guilty ;-)

    What a nice pic!
    It looks like an Hacienda.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Yes, Isabella, how about The Hon. Lord Eric Tenin, D.P., of Paris ? Let's crown him too.. um .. a coronet made of a USB cable dotted with flash bulbs. How fetching.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hello, I just stumbled upon your blog, wonderful! I love the concept of a photograph a day, especially in France! I will come back and check on you often!

    ReplyDelete
  21. LOL@lynn! Perhaps we can pain the USB cable gold? And maybe paint the flash bulbs several very royal colors so they look like crown jewels!

    Welcome wingnut!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Fantastic idea Soosha - He (yes capitals for He) would wear a robe of fabric printed with his shots and parade around the city with his DP ers faithfully throwing hard copy photo prints in his path for him to tread upon, displaying his disdain for film; the digital King that he now is. yEY! er... did i go too far? lol!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I always read, and never post. But I want to thks Eric to give the truth about our city, very far from usual stereotyp. Marci a toi, Eric.
    Un fidèle lecteur.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Merci Anonymous... (And thanks Anonymous from Kansas! And Wingnut too, come back any time).

    Lynn and Soosha: what are you on???

    ReplyDelete
  25. You i think! lol only kidding of course... aren't we Soosh?

    ReplyDelete
  26. I actually went to a school named De la Salle. Catholic high school in Minneapolis. Latin was not offered, only Spanish and German. The brothers that taught us were in fact pretty good at teaching. Until today, I didn't realize that he had invented classrooms. I wonder if he had thoughts about kids smoking in the toilets?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Oh wow, this got every one going - fascinating input mixed with a good read.

    ReplyDelete