Sunday, November 11, 2012

Remembrance Day


Today is November 11 and in a lot of European countries it's a holiday. It's the day the WWI armistice was signed and where we remember the numerous veterans who died during that terrible war. In England, and all commonwealth countries, it's called remembrance day or poppy day, for that is the flower they use to commemorate that day. We don't have this tradition in France, but two days ago I came across this  drawing by street artist Fred le Chevalier and noticed the little red flower on top of the head of the girl. It made me think of a poppy (I know it's far fetched!). 

16 comments:

  1. Remembrance Day ceremonies are currently underway in Melbourne, Australia. Like millions of others, both here and abroad, I always find this to be a profoundly sad occasion. Not only because of what WWI cost before the armistice was signed, but also because of how short-lived the peace was before WWII came thundering along. It seems to make the waste that much more pointless - and, of course, tragic. Let's bury hatred, not bodies, shall we? :-)

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  2. We'll observe Veterans Day here on Monday, for all the same reasons.

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  3. I have walked down this street to the left numerous times but never did I notice how absolutely beautiful and Parisian it looks! Also, many times I wish I knew where your photo was taken, but the sign lets us know in today's case. The Marche is an interesting market to explore, tho what I remember is paying 4 euros for a takeout portion of rice for Mr. pHX!!!
    My father is a Vet from WW2. A dwindling number of people at this point.

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  4. I love this shot, Eric. And I recognize that corner (but not the wonderful whimsical street art you have caught--I don't think the poppy association is stretched far at all!). I took quite a few photos in the same place last fall, especially around and about that cafe with red awnings and of the school with the bulls heads across the street which has memorial rings in the wall for Jewish children deported from there during WWII. This is just round the corner from Rue de Rosiers.
    -Kim

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  5. Unfortunately not a holiday in the UK - celebrations usually on the nearest Sunday. Beautiful service at Royal Albert Hall on Saturday.

    It's Poppy Day as that is the pin badge of the Royal British Legion a charity which supports veterans and families from all conflicts (it is the 30th anniversary of the Falklands war) and comes from the poppies which sprang up on the battlefields of France after WW1.

    This year much made of Olympians and para -olympians who are currently in the Armed forces and of course those who worked in security at the Olympics.

    Today (Sunday) it is the official Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph - with a minutes silence observed even in supermarkets.

    Lest we forget!!

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  6. I don't think it's far-fetched either, Eric. I love the way you've captured this with the street scene as well. The Australian Mint issued a special $2 commemorative Remembrance coin this year, featuring poppies and the those important words - Lest We Forget. Thanks to all those who have fought to protect us, and those who continue to do so.

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  7. We have the poppy symbol, too. Is that true of all the WWII allies? I wonder about Japan and Germany--how do they commemorate this day, if at all?

    PHX, my dad was a veteran, too.

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  8. In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.
    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.
    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.
    John McCrae

    And the veterans organizations in the U.S. sell "Buddy Poppies" to raise money. The poppies are manufactured by disabled veterans.

    Yeah, there aren't many WWII vets left. My father passed some years ago. I always remember that many of them experienced horrible things at a very young age, often on the first trip away from their homes. We who travel for pleasure may never understand what "foreign country" meant to them.

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    Replies
    1. Blood and flowers, blood and flowers. ...

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  9. We've made a special point during our travels to France to spend time in the cemeteries and on the beaches & battlefields. The way the French people tend to the graves of the war dead (of all nationalities including our Australian fallen) is an absolute tribute to your nation which suffered so much itself. Lest we forget..

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  10. I believe the song 'War" by Edwin Starr, answers the question: What Is It Good For?

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    1. If the answer weren't "absolutely nothing", we'd be a lot better off now. :-)

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  11. I love how you made the link between the "poppy" on his head/hat and onze novembre. And I love this guy's work. I've learned recently that it's called "Sticker Art".

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  12. Excellent shot, Eric! One of the many things I love Paris for is the street art. They never cease to amaze - even the delivery trucks at the street markets are colorfully painted.

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  13. @PHX "My father is a Vet from WW2. A dwindling number of people at this point." Like you say. Far too many. We've been lucky in Europe though, for more than 50 years now there has not been big wars like there used to be among Europeans. A big big progress. Of course, there is always a way to find a war somewhere on earth...

    @Kim " I took quite a few photos in the same place last fall, especially around and about that cafe with red awnings and of the school with the bulls". Yes it's a wonderful place to take photos isn't? I love the bulls too.

    @Eli "Today (Sunday) it is the official Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph - with a minutes silence observed even in supermarkets." Interesting; here we don't commemorate this day much, even though it has become a remembrance day for all wars too - including the more recent ones (Afghanistan, Iraq, etc.).

    @Sheel Sherree "Thanks to all those who have fought to protect us, and those who continue to do so." +100!

    @Petrea " I wonder about Japan and Germany--how do they commemorate this day, if at all?" No they don't. I did not know you had the poppy symbol too in the US.

    @Jeff and here is the confirmation " The poppies are manufactured by disabled veterans." Thanks Jeff.

    @Anonymous "We've made a special point during our travels to France to spend time in the cemeteries and on the beaches & battlefields. " Yes, and the people on the coasts, especially Normandy still have you in their heart.

    @Martin "I believe the song 'War" by Edwin Starr, answers the question: What Is It Good For?" Most of the time it's good for nothing, but when you have to fight Hitler or Gadafi, I tend to think the people who die in these wars don't die for nothing.

    @Michael "I love how you made the link between the "poppy" on his head/hat and onze novembre." Thank you. I'm glad you did not think it was far fetched then.

    @Taipan "ne of the many things I love Paris for is the street art. They never cease to amaze -" I agree. As much as I hate some stupid graffiti, when they are real work of art, they really add to the beauty of the city.

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