Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Creative architecture


You find this building a little dark for a Haussmanian construction? You're right, but wait the story is interesting! As you can guess, it's not a real one, but a concrete cast of a Haussmanian facade. And why is it so? Because the architect (Edouard François), had to solve a problem: unify 7 different era buildings into a unique one. He had the clever idea to hide them behind this facade, that he calls a "concrete 3D wall paper with glass windows hanging like paintings". Pretty creative... BTW, it's a hotel and it's located at the corner of rue Quentin Bauchartd and rue Vernet, just off the Champs Elysées.

18 comments:

  1. What a great photo, Eric! He just created a concrete envelope over the buildings to make them as one style....WOW! I have to go and check it out.

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  2. Oh, it is rue Quentin Bauchart...with a 't' at the end.

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  3. The idea sounds awful, but the realisation is superb.

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  4. I'm with Lucio—"concrete" sounds like a really bad idea, but somehow this works. Very interesting idea to brick up the actual windows and add these 3D ones.

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  5. A concrete cast of a facade, that's fascinating. It's a great photo, too, of a really interesting building.

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  6. @Beau gosse "Oh, it is rue Quentin Bauchart...with a 't' at the end." ooops, my mistake!

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  7. He obviously was influenced by the British artist Rachel Whiteread. Love his take on her!

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  8. I have to admit, I would have loved to see the before and after of this project. All those lovely window areas in the picture filled with concrete... I LOVE lots of windows and light, and dark rooms are not my favorite. But this is very interesting and once again, I can say I learned something new today!

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  9. This one inspired me to look at it more on street view. I love how this part of it peeks out between to other buildings.

    http://maps.google.com/maps?q=rue+Quentin+Bauchart+and+rue+Vernet&hl=en&ll=48.870922,2.301134&spn=0,0.002401&sll=48.871391,2.299962&sspn=0.010966,0.019205&z=19&layer=c&cbll=48.870878,2.301231&panoid=F0j7NJWWRglOm4WFlhWcNw&cbp=12,60.92,,0,-21.92

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  10. Eric, my list of things to see in Paris keeps growing. You must stop this!ha! Seriously, thank you as always for pointing out the interesting and unique. Justine, MERCI beaucoup for the link!!!

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  11. @Lucio "The idea sounds awful, but the realisation is superb." LOOOOL! It does sound awful, ans though, like you say, the result is nice.

    @PHX. "He obviously was influenced by the British artist Rachel Whiteread." i did not know of her. I just "Wikipidiaed" her (it's not a verb yet, is it?)

    @Christie "I have to admit, I would have loved to see the before and after of this project." I actually looked for a before/after photo on the Net and did not find one. I too would have been interested.

    @Justine The Google maps link is a GOOD idea!

    @Trishia "Eric, my list of things to see in Paris keeps growing. " I know the feeling LOL! This is actually easy to see as it's really closed to the Champs Elysées.

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  12. Artistically fascinating. Rooms with no windows would be creepy, but I think wonder if this portion of the hotel is maybe meeting rooms rather than guest rooms?

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  13. Yes, it looks like the restaurants and private banquet rooms are in this portion of the hotel. Windows facing the inner courtyard and gardens.

    (Ok, M. PDP, when you new polling application makes you rich and you buy a trip to Paris for me? l'Hotel Fouquet's Barriere would be fine.)

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  14. That is so creative and interesting!

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  15. um, I think I need to see it in person to see if it works for me. I'm not sure I like it just looking at the one picture. It's a good problem-solving concept though. Thanks Eric for showing it. I will put it on my list of places to look at next time I'm in Paris because it is intriguing.

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  16. It is a shame that 'architects' are allowed to put this crap in the center of Paris.

    Joris

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